Library
Nasser Al-Hilal
Collection Total:
311 Items
Last Updated:
Mar 13, 2010
Lola Rose
Coloured Lights
Ginn History: Exploration and Encounters
What's Inside? Great Inventions
Girls of Riyadh
Minaret
Leila Aboulela
Norton Anthology of English Literature: Media Companion
M. H. Abrams
Norton Anthology of English Literature
M. H. Abrams
The Norton Anthology of English Literature
M. H. Abrams
TWITTERATURE: THE WORLD'S GREATEST BOOKS RETOLD THROUGH TWITTER
EMMETT RENSIN ALEXANDER ACIMAN
Purple Hibiscus: A Novel
Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie Purple Hibiscus, Nigerian-born writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's debut, begins like many novels set in regions considered exotic by the western reader: the politics, climate, social customs, and, above all, food of Nigeria (balls of fufu rolled between the fingers, okpa bought from roadside vendors) unfold like the purple hibiscus of the title, rare and fascinating. But within a few pages, these details, however vividly rendered, melt into the background of a larger, more compelling story of a joyless family. Fifteen-year-old Kambili is the dutiful and self-effacing daughter of a rich man, a religious fanatic and domestic tyrant whose public image is of a politically courageous newspaper publisher and philanthropist. No one in Papa's ancestral village, where he is titled "Omelora" (One Who Does For the Community), knows why Kambili¹s brother cannot move one of his fingers, nor why her mother keeps losing her pregnancies. When a widowed aunt takes an interest in Kambili, her family begins to unravel and re-form itself in unpredictable ways. —Regina Marler
Half of a Yellow Sun
Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie With effortless grace, celebrated author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie illuminates a seminal moment in modern African history: Biafra's impassioned struggle to establish an independent republic in southeastern Nigeria during the late 1960s. We experience this tumultuous decade alongside five unforgettable characters: Ugwu, a thirteen-year-old houseboy who works for Odenigbo, a university professor full of revolutionary zeal; Olanna, the professor’s beautiful young mistress who has abandoned her life in Lagos for a dusty town and her lover’s charm; and Richard, a shy young Englishman infatuated with Olanna’s willful twin sister Kainene. Half of a Yellow Sun is a tremendously evocative novel of the promise, hope, and disappointment of the Biafran war.
The Thing Around Your Neck
Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie burst onto the literary scene with her remarkable debut novel, Purple Hibiscus, which critics hailed as “one of the best novels to come out of Africa in years” (Baltimore Sun), with “prose as lush as the Nigerian landscape that it powerfully evokes” (The Boston Globe); The Washington Post called her “the twenty-first-century daughter of Chinua Achebe.” Her award-winning Half of a Yellow Sun became an instant classic upon its publication three years later, once again putting her tremendous gifts—graceful storytelling, knowing compassion, and fierce insight into her characters’ hearts—on display. Now, in her most intimate and seamlessly crafted work to date, Adichie turns her penetrating eye on not only Nigeria but America, in twelve dazzling stories that explore the ties that bind men and women, parents and children, Africa and the United States.

In “A Private Experience,” a medical student hides from a violent riot with a poor Muslim woman whose dignity and faith force her to confront the realities and fears she’s been pushing away. In “Tomorrow is Too Far,” a woman unlocks the devastating secret that surrounds her brother’s death. The young mother at the center of “Imitation” finds her comfortable life in Philadelphia threatened when she learns that her husband has moved his mistress into their Lagos home. And the title story depicts the choking loneliness of a Nigerian girl who moves to an America that turns out to be nothing like the country she expected; though falling in love brings her desires nearly within reach, a death in her homeland forces her to reexamine them.

Searing and profound, suffused with beauty, sorrow, and longing, these stories map, with Adichie’s signature emotional wisdom, the collision of two cultures and the deeply human struggle to reconcile them. The Thing Around Your Neck is a resounding confirmation of the prodigious literary powers of one of our most essential writers.
The White Tiger
Aravind Adiga
Between the Assassinations
Aravind Adiga Welcome to Kittur, India. It's on India's southwestern coast, bounded by the Arabian Sea to the west and the Kaliamma River to the south and east. It's blessed with rich soil and scenic beauty, and it's been around for centuries. Of its 193,432 residents, only 89 declare themselves to be without religion or caste. And if the characters in Between the Assassinations are any indication, Kittur is an extraordinary crossroads of the brightest minds and the poorest morals, the up-and-coming and the downtrodden, and the poets and the prophets of an India that modern literature has rarely addressed.

A twelve-year-old boy named Ziauddin, a gofer at a tea shop near the railway station, is enticed into wrongdoing because a fair-skinned stranger treats him with dignity and warmth. George D'Souza, a mosquito-repellent sprayer, elevates himself to gardener and then chauffeur to the lovely, young Mrs. Gomes, and then loses it all when he attempts to be something more. A little girl's first act of love for her father is to beg on the street for money to support his drug habit. A factory owner is forced to choose between buying into underworld economics and blinding his staff or closing up shop. A privileged schoolboy, using his own ties to the Kittur underworld, sets off an explosive in a Jesuit-school classroom in protest against casteism. A childless couple takes refuge in a rapidly diminishing forest on the outskirts of town, feeding a group of "intimates" who visit only to mock them. And the loneliest member of the Marxist-Maoist Party of India falls in love with the one young woman, in the poorest part of town, whom he cannot afford to wed.

Between the Assassinations showcases the most beloved aspects of Adiga's writing to brilliant effect: the class struggle rendered personal; the fury of the underdog and the fire of the iconoclast; and the prodigiously ambitious narrative talent that has earned Adiga acclaim around the world and comparisons to Gogol, Ellison, Kipling, and Palahniuk. In the words of The Guardian (London), "Between the Assassinations shows that Adiga...is one of the most important voices to emerge from India in recent years."

A blinding, brilliant, and brave mosaic of Indian life as it is lived in a place called Kittur, Between the Assassinations, with all the humor, sympathy, and unflinching candor of The White Tiger, enlarges our understanding of the world we live in today.
The South Beach Diet: A Doctor's Plan for Fast and Lasting Weight Loss
Arthur Agatston
Ps I Love You
Cecelia Ahern
Baghdad Diaries: A Woman's Chronicle of War and Exile
Nuha Al-Radi In this often moving, sometimes wry account of life in Baghdad during the first war on Iraq and in exile in the years following, Iraqi-born, British-educated artist Nuha al-Radi shows us the effects of war on ordinary people. She recounts the day-to-day realities of living in a city under siege, where food has to be consumed or thrown out because there is no way to preserve it, where eventually people cannot sleep until the nightly bombing commences, where packs of stray dogs roam the streets (and provide her own dog Salvi with a harem) and rats invade homes. Through it all, al-Radi works at her art and gathers with neighbors and family for meals and other occasions, happy and sad.

In the wake of the war, al-Radi lives in semi-exile, shuttling between Beirut and Amman, travelling to New York, London, Mexico and Yemen. As she suffers the indignities of being an Iraqi in exile, al-Radi immerses us in a way of life constricted by the stress and effects of war and embargoes, giving texture to a reality we have only been able to imagine before now. But what emanates most vibrantly from these diaries is the spirit of endurance and the celebration of the smallest of life’s joys.
Instruction of the Student: The Method of Learning
Imam al-Zarnuji This is a remarkable volume that touches upon the method by which students of the classical Muslim world learned their studies in a traditional way. Its author, Imam al-Zarnuji, has attracted the attention of Western men of learning for centuries, as they tried to decipher the secret behind the stunning educational success of Islamic civilization.
I, the Divine: A Novel in First Chapters
Rabih Alameddine Named after the "divine" Sarah Bernhardt, red-haired Sarah Nour El-Din is "wonderful, irresistibly unique, funny, and amazing," raves Amy Tan. Determined to make of her life a work of art, she tries to tell her story, sometimes casting it as a memoir, sometimes a novel, always fascinatingly incomplete. "Alameddine's new novel unfolds like a secret... creating a tale...humorous and heartbreaking and always real" (Los Angeles Times).

"[W]ith each new approach, [Sarah] sheds another layer of her pretension, revealing another truth about her humanity" (San Francisco Weekly). Raised in a hybrid family shaped by divorce and remarriage, and by Beirut in wartime, Sarah finds a fragile peace in self-imposed exile in the United States. Her extraordinary dignity is supported by a best friend, a grown-up son, occasional sensual pleasures, and her determination to tell her own story. "Like her narrative, [Sarah's] life is broken and fragmented. [But] the bright, strange, often startling pieces...are moving and memorable" (Boston Globe). Reading group guide included.
The Five People You Meet in Heaven
Mitch Albom Part melodrama and part parable, Mitch Albom's The Five People You Meet in Heaven weaves together three stories, all told about the same man: 83-year-old Eddie, the head maintenance person at Ruby Point Amusement Park. As the novel opens, readers are told that Eddie, unsuspecting, is only minutes away from death as he goes about his typical business at the park. Albom then traces Eddie's world through his tragic final moments, his funeral, and the ensuing days as friends clean out his apartment and adjust to life without him. In alternating sections, Albom flashes back to Eddie's birthdays, telling his life story as a kind of progress report over candles and cake each year. And in the third and last thread of the novel, Albom follows Eddie into heaven where the maintenance man sequentially encounters five pivotal figures from his life (a la A Christmas Carol). Each person has been waiting for him in heaven, and, as Albom reveals, each life (and death) was woven into Eddie's own in ways he never suspected. Each soul has a story to tell, a secret to reveal, and a lesson to share. Through them Eddie understands the meaning of his own life even as his arrival brings closure to theirs.

Albom takes a big risk with the novel; such a story can easily veer into the saccharine and preachy, and this one does in moments. But, for the most part, Albom's telling remains poignant and is occasionally profound. Even with its flaws, The Five People You Meet in Heaven is a small, pure, and simple book that will find good company on a shelf next to It's A Wonderful Life. —Patrick O'Kelley
Sexual Ethics and Islam: Feminist Reflections on Qur'an, Hadith and Jurisprudence
Kecia Ali In this lucid and carefully constructed volume, feminist academic Kecia Ali examines classical Muslim texts and tries to evaluate whether a just system of sexual ethics is possible within an Islamic framework.
Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity
David Allen With first-chapter allusions to martial arts, "flow,""mind like water," and other concepts borrowed from the East (and usually mangled), you'd almost think this self-helper from David Allen should have been called Zen and the Art of Schedule Maintenance.

Not quite. Yes, Getting Things Done offers a complete system for downloading all those free-floating gotta-do's clogging your brain into a sophisticated framework of files and action lists—all purportedly to free your mind to focus on whatever you're working on. However, it still operates from the decidedly Western notion that if we could just get really, really organized, we could turn ourselves into 24/7 productivity machines. (To wit, Allen, whom the New Economy bible Fast Company has dubbed "the personal productivity guru," suggests that instead of meditating on crouching tigers and hidden dragons while you wait for a plane, you should unsheathe that high-tech saber known as the cell phone and attack that list of calls you need to return.)

As whole-life-organizing systems go, Allen's is pretty good, even fun and therapeutic. It starts with the exhortation to take every unaccounted-for scrap of paper in your workstation that you can't junk, The next step is to write down every unaccounted-for gotta-do cramming your head onto its own scrap of paper. Finally, throw the whole stew into a giant "in-basket"

That's where the processing and prioritizing begin; in Allen's system, it get a little convoluted at times, rife as it is with fancy terms, subterms, and sub-subterms for even the simplest concepts. Thank goodness the spine of his system is captured on a straightforward, one-page flowchart that you can pin over your desk and repeatedly consult without having to refer back to the book. That alone is worth the purchase price. Also of value is Allen's ingenious Two-Minute Rule: if there's anything you absolutely must do that you can do right now in two minutes or less, then do it now, thus freeing up your time and mind tenfold over the long term. It's commonsense advice so obvious that most of us completely overlook it, much to our detriment; Allen excels at dispensing such wisdom in this useful, if somewhat belabored, self-improver aimed at everyone from CEOs to soccer moms (who we all know are more organized than most CEOs to start with). —Timothy Murphy
The Hakawati
Rabih Almeddine
In the Time of the Butterflies
Julia Alvarez A glorious symphonic gift of love & courage.
Before We Were Free
Julia Alvarez What would life be like for a teen living under a dictatorship? Afraid to go to school or to talk freely? Knowing that, at the least suspicion, the secret police could invade your house, even search and destroy your private treasures? Or worse, that your father or uncles or brothers could be suddenly taken away to be jailed or tortured or killed? Such experiences have been all too common in the many Latin American dictatorships of the last 50 years. Author Julia Alvarez (How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents) and her family escaped from the Trujillo regime in the Dominican Republic when she was 10, but in Before We Were Free she imagines, through the stories of her cousins and friends, how it was for those who stayed behind.

Twelve-year-old Anita de la Torre is too involved with her own life to be more than dimly aware of the growing menace all around her, until her last cousins and uncles and aunts have fled to America and a fleet of black Volkswagens comes up the drive, bringing the secret police to the family compound to search their houses. Gradually, through overheard conversations and the explanations of her older sister, Lucinda, she comes to understand that her father and uncles are involved in a plot to kill El Jefe, the dictator, and that they are all in deadly peril. Anita's story is universal in its implications—she even keeps an Anne Frank-like diary when she and her mother must hide in a friend's house—and a tribute to those brave souls who feel, like Anita's father, that "life without freedom is no life at all." (Ages 10 to 14) —Patty Campbell
The Blood of Flowers: A Novel
Anita Amirrezvani Both a sweeping love story and a luminous portrait of a city, THE BLOOD OF FLOWERS is the mesmerizing historical novel of an ill-fated young woman whose gift as a rug designer transforms her life. Illuminated with glorious detail of persian rug-making, and brilliantly bringing to life the sights sounds and life of 17th-century Isfahan, THE BLOOD OF FLOWERS has captured readers' imaginations everywhere as a timeless tale of one woman's struggle to live a life of her choosing.
Pregnant Widow, The
Martin Amis
Fairy Tales
H.C. Andersen, Jackie Wullschlager With this new translation and selection, the unique inventiveness of Andersen's genius is revealed. At a time when children's stories were formal, moral and didactic, Hans Christian Andersen revolutionized the genre, giving an anarchic twist to traditional folklore and creating a huge number of utterly original stories that sprang directly from his imagination. From the exuberant early stories such as "The Emperor's New Clothes", through poignant masterpieces such as "The Little Mermaid" and "The Ugly Duckling", to the darker, more subversive later tales written for adults, the stories included here are endlessly experimental, both humorous and irreverent, sorrowful and strange.
The Literature of the American South: A Norton Anthology
William L. Andrews, Minrose C. Gwin, Trudier Harris, Fred Hobson The Literature of the American South spans four centuries, from the early 1600s to contemporary times, bringing together the work of nearly 90 American writers. Even if that were all it contained, this anthology would be welcome. But what makes The Literature of the American South especially noteworthy is the juxtaposition of black and white writers, whose texts make clear both divisions and commonalities, and places the literary history of the region in a new light. Excerpts from Thomas Jefferson's Notes on the State of Virginia are followed by black surveyor and inventor Benjamin Banneker's letter to Jefferson, which points out the contradiction between Jefferson owning slaves and the ideals of the Declaration of Independence. Also included is an illuminating counterpoint between the excerpt from former slave Harriet Ann Jacobs's autobiography, and the diary of plantation mistress Mary Boykin Chesnut. In addition, the volume contains material by such stalwarts as Zora Neale Hurston, Jean Toomer, Sterling A. Brown, and Richard Wright.
I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings
Maya Angelou In this first of five volumes of autobiography, poet Maya Angelou recounts a youth filled with disappointment, frustration, tragedy, and finally hard-won independence. Sent at a young age to live with her grandmother in Arkansas, Angelou learned a great deal from this exceptional woman and the tightly knit black community there. These very lessons carried her throughout the hardships she endured later in life, including a tragic occurrence while visiting her mother in St. Louis and her formative years spent in California—where an unwanted pregnancy changed her life forever. Marvelously told, with Angelou's "gift for language and observation," this "remarkable autobiography by an equally remarkable black woman from Arkansas captures, indelibly, a world of which most Americans are shamefully ignorant."
The Wagamama Cookbook
Hugo Arnold Our aim at wagamama for now and in the future is to serve great, fresh and nutritious food in an elegant, yet simple environment; to provide a helpful, friendly service and value for money. Change for us is in the form of continuous improvement.' the wagamama ethos. True to the positive eating, positive living ethos of wagamama's idiosyncratic chain of noodle restaurants, this official collection of recipes shares the secret of the hallmark culinary minimalism that has won it instant cult status worldwide. The distinctive wagamama flavour originates from the traditional 200-year-old ramen (noodle) shops of Japan which guarantee nourishment with ingredients that cleanse and nurture the mind and body. Suitable for meat-eaters, seafood lovers and vegetarians alike, the 120 recipes have been specially created by the people behind wagamama's unique house style and concentrate on cooking fresh, quality ingredients in a way that retains maximum flavour and nutrition. With mouth-watering recipes for appetisers and side dishes, hearty soups and stir-fries and exotic sweet-rice desserts and juices, plus hints and tips on ingredients, equipment, cooking techniques and structuring a meal this unique collection means that the stylish wagamama experience is now yours to take home. Whether you want to impress the health-conscious dinner guest or simply feed family and friends good, wholesome meals, this book allows you to recreate the best of Japanese cooking with a selection of delicious, low-fat, one-pot meals which are easy on your time and budget as well as your waistline.
I Am Fifteen—and I Don't Want To Die
Christine Arnothy Christine Arnothy tells her story about surviving in Budapest during World War II. She was fifteen at the time.
Chicago: A Novel
Alaa Al Aswany Egyptian and American lives collide on a college campus in post-9/11 Chicago, and crises of identity abound in the extraordinary second novel from the highly acclaimed author of The Yacoubian Building. This is a story of love, sex, friendship, hatred, and ambition, pulsating and alive with a rich and unforgettable cast of American and Arab characters who are achingly human in their desires and needs. Beautifully rendered, this is an illuminating portrait of America, a complex, often contradictory land in which triumph and failure, opportunity and oppression, small dramas and big dreams coexist. Chicago is a powerfully engrossing novel of culture and individuality from one of the most original voices in contemporary world literature.
The Robber Bride
Margaret Atwood Margaret Atwood's The Robber Bride is inspired by "The Robber Bridegroom," a wonderfully grisly tale from the Brothers Grimm in which an evil groom lures three maidens into his lair and devours them, one by one. But in her version, Atwood brilliantly recasts the monster as Zenia, a villainess of demonic proportions, and sets her loose in the lives of three friends, Tony,

Charis, and Roz. All three "have lost men, spirit, money, and time to their old college acquaintance, Zenia. At various times, and in various emotional disguises, Zenia has insinuated her way into their lives and practically demolished them.

To Tony, who almost lost her husband and jeopardized her academic career, Zenia is 'a lurking enemy commando.' To Roz, who did lose her husband and almost her magazine, Zenia is 'a cold and treacherous bitch.' To Charis, who lost a boyfriend, quarts of vegetable juice and some pet chickens, Zenia is a kind of zombie, maybe 'soulless'" (Lorrie Moore, New York Times Book Review). In love and war, illusion and deceit, Zenia's subterranean malevolence takes us deep into her enemies' pasts.
The Handmaid's Tale
Margaret Atwood In the world of the near future, who will control women's bodies?

Offred is a Handmaid in the Republic of Gilead. She may leave the home of the Commander and his wife once a day to walk to food markets whose signs are now pictures instead of words because women are no longer allowed to read. She must lie on her back once a month and pray that the Commander makes her pregnant, because in an age of declining births, Offred and the other Handmaids are only valued if their ovaries are viable.

Offred can remember the days before, when she lived and made love with her husband Luke; when she played with and protected her daughter; when she had a job, money of her own, and access to knowledge. But all of that is gone now....

Funny, unexpected, horrifying, and altogether convincing, The Handmaid's Tale is at once scathing satire, dire warning, and tour de force.
The Handmaid's Tale
Margaret Atwood In the world of the near future, who will control women's bodies?

Offred is a Handmaid in the Republic of Gilead. She may leave the home of the Commander and his wife once a day to walk to food markets whose signs are now pictures instead of words because women are no longer allowed to read. She must lie on her back once a month and pray that the Commander makes her pregnant, because in an age of declining births, Offred and the other Handmaids are only valued if their ovaries are viable.

Offred can remember the days before, when she lived and made love with her husband Luke; when she played with and protected her daughter; when she had a job, money of her own, and access to knowledge. But all of that is gone now....

Funny, unexpected, horrifying, and altogether convincing, The Handmaid's Tale is at once scathing satire, dire warning, and tour de force.
The Blind Assassin: A Novel
Margaret Atwood The Blind Assassin is a tale of two sisters, one of whom dies under ambiguous circumstances in the opening pages. The survivor, Iris Chase Griffen, initially seems a little cold-blooded about this death in the family. But as Margaret Atwood's most ambitious work unfolds—a tricky process, in fact, with several nested narratives and even an entire novel-within-a-novel—we—we're reminded of just how complicated the familial game of hide-and-seek can be:What had she been thinking of as the car sailed off the bridge, then hung suspended in the afternoon sunlight, glinting like a dragonfly, for that one instant of held breath before the plummet? Of Alex, of Richard, of bad faith, of our father and his wreckage; of God, perhaps, and her fatal, triangular bargain. Meanwhile, Atwood immediately launches into an excerpt from Laura Chase's novel, The Blind Assassin, posthumously published in 1947. In this double-decker concoction, a wealthy woman dabbles in blue-collar passion, even as her lover regales her with a series of science-fictional parables. Complicated? You bet. But the author puts all this variegation to good use, taking expert measure of our capacity for self-delusion and complicity, not to mention desolation. Almost everybody in her sprawling narrative manages to—or prefers to—overlook what's in plain sight. And memory isn't much of a salve either, as Iris points out: "Nothing is more difficult than to understand the dead, I've found; but nothing is more dangerous than to ignore them." Yet Atwood never succumbs to postmodern cynicism, or modish contempt for her characters. On the contrary, she's capable of great tenderness, and as we immerse ourselves in Iris's spliced-in memoir, it's clear that this buttoned-up socialite has been anything but blind to the chaos surrounding her. —Darya Silver
Good Bones and Simple Murders
Margaret Atwood This handsome volume combines two of Margaret Atwood's most playful books—Good Bones and Murder in the Dark—resulting in an athletically clever series of tiny fictions, prose poems, and essays that, in small, witty steps, deconstruct everything from sexual politics to the very act of writing itself. Ranging from a tongue-in-cheek appreciation of "Women's Novels" and an embittered, self-sacrificing confessional by Chicken Little to a powerful series of variations on John McCrae's "In Flanders Fields," Good Bones and Simple Murders will surprise casual Atwood fans who are accustomed to the broad intensity of her novels or the seriousness of much of her poetry.

Many of the weaker pieces in this collection now feel dated, but this is hardly Atwood's fault; scores of lesser writers worked the brief essay-fiction to death in the late '90s, but Good Bones and Simple Murders is the real thing. Atwood is blessed with the linguistic gifts necessary to make this kind of writing memorable and a keen intelligence that often gives the stories a devastating relevance. These stories are too quirky to be a useful introduction to Atwood's works, but they are nonetheless likely to delight both fans and dabblers. —Jack Illingworth
Moral Disorder
Margaret Atwood
Pride and Prejudice (Wordsworth Classics)
Jane Austen Elizabeth Bennet is the perfect Austen heroine: intelligent, generous, sensible, incapable of jealousy or any other major sin. That makes her sound like an insufferable goody-goody, but the truth is she's a completely hip character who ,if provoked, is not above skewering her antagonist with a piece of her exceptionally sharp, yet always polite, 18th-century wit. The real point of the book though, the critical question which will keep you fixated throughout, is: will Elizabeth and Mr Darcy hook up? Read this genuine all-time classic and discover the answer while enjoying a story that has charmed generation after generation.
Sense and Sensibility
Jane Austen Marianne Dashwood wears her heart on her sleeve, and when she falls in love with the dashing but unsuitable John Willougby, she ignores her sister Elinor's warning that her impulsive behaviour leaves her open to gossip and innuendo. Meanwhile Elinor, always sensitive to social convention, is struggling to conceal her own romantic disappointment, even from those closest to her. Through their parallel experience of love - and its threatened loss - the sisters learn that sense must mix with sensibility if they are to find personal happiness in a society where status and money govern the rules of love.
Wall and Piece
Banksy The collected works of Britain’s most wanted artist.

Artistic genius, political activist, painter and decorator, mythic legend or notorious graffiti artist? The work of Banksy is unmistakable (except maybe when it’s squatting in the New York’s Metropolitan Museum or Museum of Modern Art.) Banksy is responsible for decorating the streets, walls, bridges and zoos of towns and cites throughout the world.

Witty and subversive, his stencils show monkeys with weapons of mass destruction, policeman with smiley faces, rats with drills and umbrellas. If you look hard enough you’ll find your own. His statements, incitements, ironies and epigrams are by turns intelligent and witty comments on everything from the monarchy and capitalism to the war in Iraq and farm animals.

His identity remains unknown, but his work is prolific. And now for the first time, he’s putting together the best of his work—old and new—in a fully illustrated color volume.

Banksy, real name unknown, was born in Bristol, England.
Wall and Piece
Banksy The collected works of Britain’s most wanted artist.

Artistic genius, political activist, painter and decorator, mythic legend or notorious graffiti artist? The work of Banksy is unmistakable (except maybe when it’s squatting in the New York’s Metropolitan Museum or Museum of Modern Art.) Banksy is responsible for decorating the streets, walls, bridges and zoos of towns and cites throughout the world.

Witty and subversive, his stencils show monkeys with weapons of mass destruction, policeman with smiley faces, rats with drills and umbrellas. If you look hard enough you’ll find your own. His statements, incitements, ironies and epigrams are by turns intelligent and witty comments on everything from the monarchy and capitalism to the war in Iraq and farm animals.

His identity remains unknown, but his work is prolific. And now for the first time, he’s putting together the best of his work—old and new—in a fully illustrated color volume.

Banksy, real name unknown, was born in Bristol, England.
The Pleasure of the Text
Roland Barthes What is it that we do when we enjoy a text? What is the pleasure of reading? The French critic and theorist Roland Barthes’s answers to these questions constitute "perhaps for the first time in the history of criticism . . . not only a poetics of reading . . . but a much more difficult achievement, an erotics of reading . . . . Like filings which gather to form a figure in a magnetic field, the parts and pieces here do come together, determined to affirm the pleasure we must take in our reading as against the indifference of (mere) knowledge." —Richard Howard
Comparative Literature: A Critical Introduction
Susan Bassnett This major new introduction to comparative literature is for the students coming to the subject for the first time. Through an examination of a series of case studies and new theoretical developments, Bassnett reviews the current state of comparative literature world-wide in the 1990s.
The Norton Anthology of American Literature, Sixth Edition, Volume A: Literature to 1820
Nina Baym The Norton Anthology of American Literature is the classic survey of American literature from its sixteenth-century origins to its flourishing present. This volume—Volume A—covers American literature from its beginning to 1820.
The Norton Anthology of American Literature, Sixth Edition, Volume C: 1865-1914
Nina Baym The Norton Anthology of American Literature is the classic survey of American literature from its sixteenth-century origins to its flourishing present. This volume—Volume C—covers American literature from 1865 to 1914.
The Norton Anthology of American Literature, Sixth Edition, Volume D: Between the Wars 1914-1945
Nina Baym The Norton Anthology of American Literature is the classic survey of American literature from its sixteenth-century origins to its flourishing present. This volume—Volume D—covers American literature from 1914 to 1945.
The Norton Anthology of American Literature, Sixth Edition, Volume E: Literature Since 1945
Nina Baym The Norton Anthology of American Literature is the classic survey of American literature from its sixteenth-century origins to its flourishing present. This volume—Volume E—covers American literature from 1945 to 2002.
The Norton Anthology of American Literature, Volume B: 1820-1865
Nina Baym The Norton Anthology of American Literature is the classic survey of American literature from its sixteenth-century origins to its flourishing present. This volume—Volume B—covers American literature from 1820 to 1865.
The Second Sex
Simone De Beauvoir In The Second Sex, Simone de Beauvoir posed questions many men, and women, had yet to ponder when the book was released in 1953. "One wonders if women still exist, if they will always exist, whether or not it is desirable that they should ...," she says in this comprehensive treatise on women. She weaves together history, philosophy, economics, biology, and a host of other disciplines to show women's place in the world and to postulate on the power of sexuality. This is a powerful piece of writing in a time before "feminism" was even a phrase, much less a movement.
Computer Confluence: Exploring Tomorrow's Technology
George Beekman For introductory courses in computer concepts or computer literacy often including instruction in Microsoft Office. Integrates three information sources-an illustrated textbook, a multimedia CD, and a Companion Website-with a lively writing style to explore the promises and challenges of information technology, its effect on businesses, people, society, and the future.
Media and Communication Research Methods: An Introduction to Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches
Arthur Asa Berger Arthur Asa Berger employs his signature style - a practical focus, the use of numerous examples, a step-by-step approach, and humor - in his latest book, Media and Communication Research Methods. Combining both qualitative and quantitative research methods, this introductory text covers the topics thoroughly and is clearly written and fun-to-read. This book is ideal for beginning research students both at the graduate and undergraduate level because it is clear, concise, and accompanied by many detailed examples.

- attention-grabbing dialogue begins each chapter and gives students insights into a particular research technique

- the first two chapters answer the question "what is research?" and describe a library search and literature review

- four chapters on textual analysis explain clearly semiotic analysis, rhetorical analysis, ideological criticism, and psychoanalytic criticism

- four chapters on qualitative methods elucidate interviews, historical analysis, ethnomethodological research, and participant observation

- four chapters on quantitative methods make contents analysis, surveys, experiments, and descriptive statistics easy to understand

- the final two chapters will help students better understand research papers

- the glossary at the end of the book defines numerous research concepts.

With his thorough coverage of research strategies, his engaging writing style, and even his own illustrations, Berger has written a captivating book for communication research students.
Invitation to Sociology: A Humanistic Perspective
Peter L. Berger This lucid book presents the discipline of sociology to both the general reader and the student. Viewing sociology in the humanist tradition, Berger points out its affinity to history and philosophy, as well as its need for scientific procedures.
The Myths of Innovation
Scott Berkun Scott Berkun Discusses Innovation at Amazon.com Headquarters

Scott Berkun, author of The Myths of Innovation and The Art of Project Management, visited Amazon.com to discuss "epiphany myths" and the realities—and effort—of implementing innovation in your own life and work. Watch the video: High bandwidthLow bandwidth

Praise for The Myths of Innovation:

"…Small, simple, powerful: an innovative book about innovation."
—Don Norman, Nielsen Norman Group, Northwestern University; author of Emotional Design and Design of Everyday Things

"The naked truth about innovation is ugly, funny, and eye-opening, but it sure isn't what most of us have come to believe. With this book, Berkun sets us free to try to change the world unencumbered with misconceptions about how innovation happens."
—Guy Kawasaki, author of The Art of the Start

"This book cuts through the hype, analyzes what is essential, and more importantly, what is not. You will leave with a thorough understanding of what really drives innovation."
— Werner Vogels, CTO, Amazon.com
More Words You Should Know
Michelle Bevilacqua Lots of people need a quick and authoritative way to identify and define the most troublesome common words. But reading dictionaries is no one's idea of fun! If only there were a list-not of every word, but of the right words, the ones that are used frequently but don't quite register when you come across them.

More Words You Should Know features straightforward, succinct definitions and sentence examples of 1,500 tough but common words.
The New Business of Banking
George M. Bollenbacher
Understanding Science: Bk. 1
Joe Boyd, Walter Whitelaw "Understanding Science" is a complete process-based science course for pupils in the first two years of secondary school. It has been designed to encompass all ranges of ability and to help develop those skills necessary as a foundation for any GCSE or Scottish Standard Grade science course. For each of the two years there is a pupils' book and an accompanying teachers' resource book. The pupils' books offer units dealing with important aspects of science in which key skills are stressed, ranging from general writing and practical skills to those involving experimental design and hypothesizing. A range of open-ended problems and technological issues are included to encourage discussion. There are regular points in the text where pupils can assess their progress. For more advanced pupils, there is also a series of activity-based "extensions". The teachers' resource books contain notes which provide guidance on both general issues and specifics, such as equipment and materials for practical work. In addition there is a range of copyright waived support material including unit tests, worksheets and 50 skills sheets.
Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants
Ann Brashares
Fundamentals of Corporate Finance
Richard A. Brealey, Stewart C. Myers, Alan J. Marcus This text balances core coverage of the fundamental topics in corporate finance with an emphasis on modern business decision-making. The key principles and mechanics of the time value of money - a central concept - are carefully detailed and illustrated.
The Da Vinci Code
Dan Brown The Da Vinci Code
The Da Vinci Code: Special Illustrated Edition: A Novel
Dan Brown With The Da Vinci Code, Dan Brown masterfully concocts an intelligent and lucid thriller that marries the gusto of an international murder mystery with a collection of fascinating esoteria culled from 2,000 years of Western history.

A murder in the silent after-hour halls of the Louvre museum reveals a sinister plot to uncover a secret that has been protected by a clandestine society since the days of Christ. The victim is a high-ranking agent of this ancient society who, in the moments before his death, manages to leave gruesome clues at the scene that only his granddaughter, noted cryptographer Sophie Neveu, and Robert Langdon, a famed symbologist, can untangle. The duo become both suspects and detectives searching for not only Neveu's grandfather's murderer but also the stunning secret of the ages he was charged to protect. Mere steps ahead of the authorities and the deadly competition, the mystery leads Neveu and Langdon on a breathless flight through France, England, and history itself. Brown (Angels and Demons) has created a page-turning thriller that also provides an amazing interpretation of Western history. Brown's hero and heroine embark on a lofty and intriguing exploration of some of Western culture's greatest mysteries—from the nature of the Mona Lisa's smile to the secret of the Holy Grail. Though some will quibble with the veracity of Brown's conjectures, therein lies the fun. The Da Vinci Code is an enthralling read that provides rich food for thought. —Jeremy Pugh
Angels & Demons: A Novel
Dan Brown It takes guts to write a novel that combines an ancient secret brotherhood, the Swiss Conseil Européen pour la Recherche Nucléaire, a papal conclave, mysterious ambigrams, a plot against the Vatican, a mad scientist in a wheelchair, particles of antimatter, jets that can travel 15,000 miles per hour, crafty assassins, a beautiful Italian physicist, and a Harvard professor of religious iconology. It takes talent to make that novel anything but ridiculous. Kudos to Dan Brown (Digital Fortress) for achieving the nearly impossible. Angels & Demons is a no-holds-barred, pull-out-all-the-stops, breathless tangle of a thriller—think Katherine Neville's The Eight (but cleverer) or Umberto Eco's Foucault's Pendulum (but more accessible).

Harvard symbologist Robert Langdon is shocked to find proof that the legendary secret society, the Illuminati—dedicated since the time of Galileo to promoting the interests of science and condemning the blind faith of Catholicism—is alive, well, and murderously active. Brilliant physicist Leonardo Vetra has been murdered, his eyes plucked out, and the society's ancient symbol branded upon his chest. His final discovery, antimatter, the most powerful and dangerous energy source known to man, has disappeared—only to be hidden somewhere beneath Vatican City on the eve of the election of a new pope. Langdon and Vittoria, Vetra's daughter and colleague, embark on a frantic hunt through the streets, churches, and catacombs of Rome, following a 400-year-old trail to the lair of the Illuminati, to prevent the incineration of civilization.

Brown seems as much juggler as author—there are lots and lots of balls in the air in this novel, yet Brown manages to hurl the reader headlong into an almost surreal suspension of disbelief. While the reader might wish for a little more sardonic humor from Langdon, and a little less bombastic philosophizing on the eternal conflict between religion and science, these are less fatal flaws than niggling annoyances—readers should have no trouble skimming past them and immersing themselves in a heck of a good read. "Brain candy" it may be, but my! It's tasty. —Kelly Flynn
Deception Point
Dan Brown Penzler Pick, December 2001: In the world of page-turning thrillers, Dan Brown holds a special place in the hearts of many of us. After his first book, Digital Fortress, almost passed me by, he wrote Angels and Demons, which was probably one of the half-dozen most exciting thrillers of last year. It is a pleasure to report that his new book lives up to his reputation as a writer whose research and talent make his stories exciting, believable, and just plain unputdownable.

The time is now and President Zachary Herney is facing a very tough reelection. His opponent, Senator Sedgwick Sexton, is a powerful man with powerful friends and a mission: to reduce NASA's spending and move space exploration into the private sector. He has numerous supporters, including many beyond the businesses who will profit from this because of the embarrassment of 1996, when the Clinton administration was informed by NASA that proof existed of life on other planets. That information turned out to be premature, if not incorrect. (This story is true; I repeat, Dan Brown's research is very, very good.) The embattled president is assured that a rare object buried deep in the Arctic ice will prove to have far-reaching implications on America's space program. The find, however, needs to be verified.

Enter Rachel Sexton, a gister for the National Reconnaissance Office. Gisters reduce complex reports into single-page briefs, and in this case the president needs that confirmation before he broadcasts to the nation, probably ensuring his reelection. It's tricky because Rachel is the daughter of his opponent. Rachel is thrilled to be on the team traveling to the Arctic circle. She is a realist about her father's politics and has little respect for his stand on NASA, but Senator Sexton cannot help but have a problem with her involvement.

Adventure, romance, murder, skullduggery, and nail-biting tension ensue. By the end of Deception Point, the reader will be much better informed about how our space program works and how our politicians react to new information. Bring on the next Dan Brown thriller! —Otto Penzler
The Good Earth
Pearl S. Buck Pearl S. Buck's epic Pulitzer Prize-winning novel of a China that was — now in a Contemporary Classics edition.

Though more than sixty years have passed since this remarkable novel won the Pulitzer Prize, it has retained its popularity and become one of the great modern classics. "I can only write what I know, and I know nothing but China, having always lived there," wrote Pearl Buck. In The Good Earth she presents a graphic view of a China when the last emperor reigned and the vast political and social upheavals of the twentieth century were but distant rumblings for the ordinary people. This moving, classic story of the honest farmer Wang Lung and his selfless wife O-lan is must reading for those who would fully appreciate the sweeping changes that have occurred in the lives of the Chinese people during this century.

Nobel Prize winner Pearl S. Buck traces the whole cycle of life: its terrors, its passions, its ambitions and rewards. Her brilliant novel — beloved by millions of readers — is a universal tale of the destiny of man.
A Clockwork Orange
Anthony Burgess Anthony Burgess's modern classic of youthful violence and social redemption, reissued to include the controversial last chapter not previously published in this country, with a new introduction by the author.
Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity
Judith Butler Since its publication in 1990, Gender Trouble has become one of the key works of contemporary feminist theory, and an essential work for anyone interested in the study of gender, queer theory, or the politics of sexuality in culture. This is the text where Judith Butler began to advance the ideas that would go on to take life as "performativity theory," as well as some of the first articulations of the possibility for subversive gender practices, and she writes in her preface to the 10th anniversary edition released in 1999 that one point of Gender Trouble was "not to prescribe a new gendered way of life [...] but to open up the field of possibility for gender [...]" Widely taught, and widely debated, Gender Trouble continues to offer a powerful critique of heteronormativity and of the function of gender in the modern world.
Master Your Memory
Tony Buzan Would you like to: *Double you current memory capacity? *Be able to remember perfectly a list of 100 objects in under two hours? *Expand your memory and knowledge of the world's greatest artists, composers and writers? *Raise your IQ and achieve greater success in all aspects of life? *Remember telephone and other vital numbers? Master Your Memory is designed to help you to do just that. This edition of Master Your Memory introduces you to the last great memory invention of the last millennium the Self-Enhancing Master memory matrix. This technique will allow you to memorise anything from ten to fifty thousand items with comparative ease, while at the same time exercising and improving your Memory Muscle.
Size Doesn't Matter
Meg Cabot
Van Gogh
Pierre Cahanne
The Rule of Four
Ian Caldwell, Dustin Thomason An ivy league murder, a mysterious coded manuscript, and the secrets of a Renaissance prince collide memorably in The Rule of Four—a brilliant work of fiction that weaves together suspense and scholarship, high art and unimaginable treachery.

It's Easter at Princeton. Seniors are scrambling to finish their theses. And two students, Tom Sullivan and Paul Harris, are a hair's breadth from solving the mysteries of the Hypnerotomachia Poliphili—a renowned text attributed to an Italian nobleman, a work that has baffled scholars since its publication in 1499. For Tom, their research has been a link to his family's past—and an obstacle to the woman he loves. For Paul, it has become an obsession, the very reason for living. But as their deadline looms, research has stalled—until a long-lost diary surfaces with a vital clue. And when a fellow researcher is murdered just hours later, Tom and Paul realize that they are not the first to glimpse the Hypnerotomachia 's secrets.

Suddenly the stakes are raised, and as the two friends sift through the codes and riddles at the heart of the text, they are beginnning to see the manuscript in a new light—not simply as a story of faith, eroticism and pedantry, but as a bizarre, coded mathematical maze. And as they come closer and closer to deciphering the final puzzle of a book that has shattered careers, friendships and families, they know that their own lives are in mortal danger. Because at least one person has been killed for knowing too much. And they know even more.

From the streets of fifteenth-century Rome to the rarified realm of the Ivy League, from a shocking 500 year-old murder scene to the drama of a young man's coming of age, The Rule of Four takes us on an entertaining, illuminating tour of history—as it builds to a pinnacle of nearly unbearable suspense.

From the Hardcover edition.
Ecotopia
Ernest Callenbach A novel portraying a future ecologically sustainable society located in what was formerly the states of Washington, Oregon, and northern California. It is a hopeful vision of what industrial society must become if it is to survive, presented in news-story and diary entry forms. Callenbach gives us a vivid, comprehensive, positive vision of what the earth's future might look like, if those who care about sustainability had a say. Highly imaginative, this much-loved book is at the same time blessedly down to earth. Nearly a million copies have been sold in nine languages.
Biology
Neil A. Campbell With an extraordinary reputation for authority and accuracy, this landmark biology text continues to be an invaluable learning partner for students and teachers. The authors focus on the "big ideas" of biology: each chapter is organized around key concepts that build in a logical way, and are clearly explained and reinforced by the text discussion and illustration. The straightforward writing style, appropriate level of depth, and judiciously-selected coverage are other hallmarks. A comprehensive new supplements package includes a highly-interactive student learning CD-ROM. The Special Edition of The Biology Place allows students to explore animations, take quizzes, and access the most up-to-date biology resources on the web.
How to Win Friends and Influence People
Dale Carnegie This grandfather of all people-skills books was first published in 1937. It was an overnight hit, eventually selling 15 million copies. How to Win Friends and Influence People is just as useful today as it was when it was first published, because Dale Carnegie had an understanding of human nature that will never be outdated. Financial success, Carnegie believed, is due 15 percent to professional knowledge and 85 percent to "the ability to express ideas, to assume leadership, and to arouse enthusiasm among people." He teaches these skills through underlying principles of dealing with people so that they feel important and appreciated. He also emphasizes fundamental techniques for handling people without making them feel manipulated. Carnegie says you can make someone want to do what you want them to by seeing the situation from the other person's point of view and "arousing in the other person an eager want." You learn how to make people like you, win people over to your way of thinking, and change people without causing offense or arousing resentment. For instance, "let the other person feel that the idea is his or hers," and "talk about your own mistakes before criticizing the other person." Carnegie illustrates his points with anecdotes of historical figures, leaders of the business world, and everyday folks. —Joan Price
The Shakespeare Secret
J.L. Carrell
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
Lewis Carroll A new twist on Lewis Carroll's classic tale of the wildly weird, this prose collection combines both Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass with chapter illustrations. Features a brand-new, painted cover by celebrated artist Jill Thompson!
The Penguin Guide to Literature in English: Britain and Ireland
Ronald Carter, John McRae *Features illustrations, charts and a glossary of literary and cultural terms*Suitable for upper intermediate and advanced level students*Written by experts especially for non-native speakers of English
Activebook Version 1.0 Principles of Microeconomics
Karl E. Case, Ray C. Fair Written by two highly respected economists and educators, this book uses the “Stories, Graphs, and Equations” approach to make economic concepts accessible and relevant to readers with various learning styles. The online, digital book uses multimedia resources to greatly enhance the learning experience, and is known for its unified and logical structure, lively writing style, and clear explanations. Chapter topics include the scope and method of economics; the economic problem: scarcity and choice; demand, supply, and market equilibrium; the price system, demand and supply, and elasticity; household behavior and consumer choice; the production process: the behavior of profit maximizing firms; short-run costs and output decisions; costs and output decisions in the long run; input demand: the labor and land markets and the capital market and the investment decision; monopoly and antitrust policy; monopolistic competition and oligopoly; income distribution and poverty; international trade, comparative advantage, and protectionism; and economic growth in developing and transitional economies. For individuals seeking a better understanding of microeconomics.
Don Quixote
Miguel De Cervantes Edith Grossman's definitive English translation of the Spanish masterpiece. Widely regarded as one of the funniest and most tragic books ever written, Don Quixote chronicles the adventures of the self-created knight-errant Don Quixote of La Mancha and his faithful squire, Sancho Panza, as they travel through sixteenth-century Spain. You haven't experienced Don Quixote in English until you've read this masterful translation. This P.S. edition features an extra 16 pages of insights into the book, including author interviews, recommended reading, and more.
Wild Swans : Three Daughters of China
Jung Chang In Wild Swans Jung Chang recounts the evocative, unsettling, and insistently gripping story of how three generations of women in her family fared in the political maelstrom of China during the 20th century. Chang's grandmother was a warlord's concubine. Her gently raised mother struggled with hardships in the early days of Mao's revolution and rose, like her husband, to a prominent position in the Communist Party before being denounced during the Cultural Revolution. Chang herself marched, worked, and breathed for Mao until doubt crept in over the excesses of his policies and purges. Born just a few decades apart, their lives overlap with the end of the warlords' regime and overthrow of the Japanese occupation, violent struggles between the Kuomintang and the Communists to carve up China, and, most poignant for the author, the vicious cycle of purges orchestrated by Chairman Mao that discredited and crushed millions of people, including her parents.
PAPILLON Parts 1 and 2
Henri Charriere
The Legal and Regulatory Environment
Henry R. Cheeseman For Legal Environment of Business courses. This best-selling text focuses on how the legal environment impacts business decisions. This text represents the single most up-to-date book available for the Legal Environment course. It fully integrates the AACSB curriculum standards throughout the text with extensive international, ethical and critical thinking examples. Cheeseman examines how the current legal environment, government regulation, and e-commerce environment impact today's business decisions. The cases are cutting edge, exciting, and engaging, and the reasoning of each case is presented in the language of the court.
The Other Hand
Chris Cleave We don't want to tell you too much about this book. It is a truly special story and we don't want to spoil it. Nevertheless, you need to know something, so we will just say this: It is extremely funny, but the African beach scene is horrific. The story starts there, but the book doesn't. And it's what happens afterwards that is most important. Once you have read it, you'll want to tell everyone about it. When you do, please don't tell them what happens either. The magic is in how it unfolds.
Incendiary: A Novel
Chris Cleave You aren't stupid.
You know there's no such thing as a perfect mother.
Plenty of other books will tell you there is, but this one
won't lie to you.

I was weak and I cheated and I was punished, but my god
I loved my child through all of it. Love means you never
break, and it means you're stronger than the things they
do to you. I know this is true because I have been through
fire, and I am the proof that love survives.

I am not a perfect mother but I will tell you the perfect
truth, because this is you and me talking.

This is my story.
The Fifth Mountain
Paulo Coelho With The Fifth Mountain, Paulo Coelho turns his talent for spiritual fiction to the story of the Biblical prophet Elijah. Like a blossoming flower, Coelho opens up the brief account of Elijah's flight from Gilead and his time in Zarephath. He deepens the prophet's character by revealing the thoughts, doubts, and discoveries that Elijah must have experienced as he struggled to find his course in life amidst the confusion of war and political turmoil. When being a prophet of the God of the Israelites is like a warrant for your death, concerns about your chosen path are sure to arise. Perhaps it is this believability in Coelho's retelling that makes it so evocative, or it may be the bit of Old Testament wisdom he brings to popular literature of the 20th century: "the words of the lord are written in the world around us. Merely be attentive to what happens in your life, and you will discover where."
The Alchemist
Paulo Coelho Like the one-time bestseller Jonathan Livingston Seagull, The Alchemist presents a simple fable, based on simple truths and places it in a highly unique situation. And though we may sniff a bestselling formula, it is certainly not a new one: even the ancient tribal storytellers knew that this is the most successful method of entertaining an audience while slipping in a lesson or two. Brazilian storyteller Paulo Coehlo introduces Santiago, an Andalusian shepherd boy who one night dreams of a distant treasure in the Egyptian pyramids. And so he's off: leaving Spain to literally follow his dream.

Along the way he meets many spiritual messengers, who come in unassuming forms such as a camel driver and a well-read Englishman. In one of the Englishman's books, Santiago first learns about the alchemists—men who believed that if a metal were heated for many years, it would free itself of all its individual properties, and what was left would be the "Soul of the World." Of course he does eventually meet an alchemist, and the ensuing student-teacher relationship clarifies much of the boy's misguided agenda, while also emboldening him to stay true to his dreams. "My heart is afraid that it will have to suffer," the boy confides to the alchemist one night as they look up at a moonless night.

"Tell your heart that the fear of suffering is worse than the suffering itself," the alchemist replies. "And that no heart has ever suffered when it goes in search of its dreams, because every second of the search is a second's encounter with God and with eternity." —Gail Hudson
Veronika Decides to Die: A Novel of Redemption
Paulo Coelho Twenty-four-year-old Veronika seems to have everything — youth and beauty, boyfriends and a loving family, a fulfilling job. But something is missing in her life. So, one cold November morning, she takes a handful of sleeping pills expecting never to wake up. But she does — at a mental hospital where she is told that she has only days to live.

Inspired by events in Coelho's own life, Veronika Decides to Die questions the meaning of madness and celebrates individuals who do not fit into patterns society considers to be normal. Bold and illuminating, it is a dazzling portrait of a young woman at the crossroads of despair and liberation, and a poetic, exuberant appreciation of each day as a renewed opportunity.
The Devil and Miss Prym: A Novel of Temptation
Paulo Coelho A stranger arrives at the remote village of Viscos, carrying with him a backpack containing a notebook and eleven gold bars. He comes searching for the answer to a question that torments him: Are human beings, in essence, good or evil? In welcoming the mysterious foreigner, the whole village becomes an accomplice to his sophisticated plot, which will forever mark their lives.

A novel of temptation by the internationally bestselling author Paulo Coelho, The Devil and Miss Prym is a thought-provoking parable of a community devoured by greed, cowardice, and fear—as it struggles with the choice between good and evil.
Like the Flowing River: Thoughts and Reflections
Paulo Coelho
The Witch of Portobello: A Novel
Paulo Coelho How do we find the courage to always be true to ourselves—even if we are unsure of who we are?

That is the central question of international bestselling author Paulo Coelho's profound new work, The Witch of Portobello. It is the story of a mysterious woman named Athena, told by the many who knew her well—or hardly at all. Like The Alchemist, The Witch of Portobello is the kind of story that will transform the way readers think about love, passion, joy, and sacrifice.
Brida
Paulo Coelho
Winner Stands Alone
Paulo Coelho
Drama: Classical to Contemporary, Revised Edition
John C. Coldewey, W. R. Streitberger This is one of the most comprehensive anthologies of enduring masterpieces of Western drama available. The critical and interpretive histories of the works, as well as background on the theaters where the plays were produced highlight the cultural and theatrical context of dramatic performances. The collection features 39 plays and 1 trope from all periods of Western drama including Greek, Medieval, Renaissance, Neoclassical, Early Modern European, Later Modern American and European, and Contemporary. For individuals interested in expanding their knowledge and critical understanding of dramatic performances, their histories and the important role of reviewers.
Do-it-yourself: A Complete Beginner's Home Improvement Manual (Home Decorating, Repairs & Maintenance)
Mike Collins, David Holloway, Brenda Legge, Dianne Carr
Under Western Eyes (Konemann Classics)
Joseph Conrad
Principle Centered Leadership
Stephen R. Covey
The 8th Habit: From Effectiveness to Greatness
Stephen R. Covey In the more than fifteen years since its publication, the classic The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People has become an international phenomenon with over fifteen million copies sold. Tens of millions of people in business, government, schools, and families, and, most important, as individuals have dramatically improved their lives and organisations by applying the principles of Stephen R. Covey's classic book.

The world, though, is a vastly changed place. The challenges and complexity we all face in our relationships, families, professional lives, and communities are of an entirely new order of magnitude. Being effective as individuals and organisations is no longer merely an option — survival in today's world requires it. But in order to thrive, innovate, excel, and lead in what Covey calls the ”New Knowledge Worker Age“, we must build on and move beyond effectiveness. The call of this new era in human history is for greatness; it's for fulfillment, passionate execution, and significant contribution.

Accessing the higher levels of human genius and motivation in today's new reality requires a sea change in thinking: a new mind-set, a new skill-set, a new tool-set — in short, a whole new habit. The crucial challenge of our world today is this: to find our voice and inspire others to find theirs. It is what Covey calls the 8th Habit.

So many people feel frustrated, discouraged, unappreciated, and undervalued — with little or no sense of voice or unique contribution. The 8th Habit is the answer to the soul's yearning for greatness, the organisation's imperative for significance and superior results, and humanity's search for its ”voice“. Profound, compelling, and stunningly timely, this groundbreaking new book of next-level thinking gives a clear way to finally tap the limitless value-creation promise of the ”Knowledge Worker Age“. The 8th Habit shows how to solve such common dilemmas asž

•People want peace of mind and good relationships, but also want to keep their lifestyle and habits. •Relationships are built on trust, but most people think more in terms of ”me“ my wants, my needs, my rights. •Management wants more for less; employees want more of ”what's in it for me“ for less time and effort. •Businesses are run by the economic rules of the marketplace; organisations are run by the cultural rules of the workplace. •Society operates by its dominant social values, but must live with the consequences of the inviolable operation of natural laws and principles.

Covey's new book will transform the way we think about ourselves and our purpose in life, about our organisations, and about humankind. Just as The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People helped us focus on effectiveness, The 8th Habit shows us the way to greatness.
Culture and Values: A Survey of the Humanities, Alternate Edition
Lawrence S. Cunningham, John J. Reich Trusted by professors of the humanities survey course for over twenty years, CULTURE AND VALUES covers Western cultures along with important non-Western cultures, providing students solid, accessible introductions to art, music, philosophy, literature, and more. Available in two volumes, or as an alternate single volume without end-of-chapter readings, this text remains the most readable and reliable textbook for college and university students in the integrated humanities.
The Origin of Species
Charles Darwin, Gillian Beer It's hard to talk about The Origin of Species without making statements that seem overwrought and fulsome. But it's true: this is indeed one of the most important and influential books ever written, and it is one of the very few groundbreaking works of science that is truly readable.

To a certain extent it suffers from the Hamlet problem—it—it's full of clichés! Or what are now clichés, but which Darwin was the first to pen. Natural selection, variation, the struggle for existence, survival of the fittest: it's all in here.

Darwin's friend and "bulldog" T.H. Huxley said upon reading the Origin, "How extremely stupid of me not to have thought of that." Alfred Russel Wallace had thought of the same theory of evolution Darwin did, but it was Darwin who gathered the mass of supporting evidence—on domestic animals and plants, on variability, on sexual selection, on dispersal—that swept most scientists before it. It's hardly necessary to mention that the book is still controversial: Darwin's remark in his conclusion that "Light will be thrown on the origin of man and his history" is surely the pinnacle of British understatement. —Mary Ellen Curtin
Discourse on the Method for Conducting One's Reason Well and for Seeking Truth in the Sciences
Rene Descartes
The Red Tent
Anita Diamant The red tent is the place where women gathered during their cycles of birthing, menses, and even illness. Like the conversations and mysteries held within this feminine tent, this sweeping piece of fiction offers an insider's look at the daily life of a biblical sorority of mothers and wives and their one and only daughter, Dinah. Told in the voice of Jacob's daughter Dinah (who only received a glimpse of recognition in the Book of Genesis), we are privy to the fascinating feminine characters who bled within the red tent. In a confiding and poetic voice, Dinah whispers stories of her four mothers, Rachel, Leah, Zilpah, and Bilhah—all wives to Jacob, and each one embodying unique feminine traits. As she reveals these sensual and emotionally charged stories we learn of birthing miracles, slaves, artisans, household gods, and sisterhood secrets. Eventually Dinah delves into her own saga of betrayals, grief, and a call to midwifery.

"Like any sisters who live together and share a husband, my mother and aunties spun a sticky web of loyalties and grudges," Anita Diamant writes in the voice of Dinah. "They traded secrets like bracelets, and these were handed down to me the only surviving girl. They told me things I was too young to hear. They held my face between their hands and made me swear to remember." Remembering women's earthy stories and passionate history is indeed the theme of this magnificent book. In fact, it's been said that The Red Tent is what the Bible might have been had it been written by God's daughters, instead of her sons. —Gail Hudson
Great Expectations (Puffin Classics)
Charles Dickens An absorbing mystery as well as a morality tale, the story of Pip, a poor village lad, and his expectations of wealth is Dickens at his most deliciously readable. The cast of characters includes kindly Joe Gargery, the loyal convict Abel Magwitch and the haunting Miss Havisham. If you have heartstrings, count on them being tugged.
Windows Script Host Programmer's Reference
Dino, Dino Esposito Aimed at any system administrator or Windows programmer, Dino Esposito's Windows Scripting Host Programmer's Reference provides a truly excellent guide to getting the most out of the new Windows Scripting Host (WSH) for Windows batch processing. Filled with many short examples and tips on scripting strategy, this handy book provides a really invaluable mix of advice and nuts-and-bolts code examples.

This concise how-to provides much more than a reference to WSH objects (though naturally, the book includes reference material on VBScript, JScript, and the WSH object model). Esposito is very skilled at showing off various pieces of WSH while paying attention to real-world scripting tasks. In the interest of practical programming, he includes numerous small examples for common administrative tasks using WSH, such as working with files, the Windows Registry, and automating installation and using dialogs within WSH scripts.

Though powerful, WSH doesn't do everything. A standout feature here is the author's custom "component gallery" of extensions to WSH for common tasks through COM objects. (Sample components are included for browsing files, managing processes, and displaying messages to users.) The book's final example, which automates the creation of an invoice in Microsoft Word and then e-mails it, shows off WSH as an effective "glue" that can let different components and applications work together.

As this book suggests, WSH is a powerful tool for wiring together Windows components. Armed with this guide to creating effective WSH scripts, any administrator or programmer can be productive with Windows scripting. —Richard Dragan

Topics covered: Windows Script Host (WSH) overview, installing WSH, batch processing, VBScript and JScript, Windows Script Interfaces, system administration, console and graphical WSH applications, shell support, the WSH object model, running and stopping scripts and programs, COM objects, arguments, accessing the Registry, shortcuts, URLs, files and directories, installation scripts, Script Run-time Library (SRL), shell automation objects, reusability issues (classes, custom COM objects, the Windows Script Component [WSC] wizard, dialog boxes, and user interfaces), and script security.
Women of Algiers in Their Apartment, Translated by Marjolijn de Jager, Afterword by Clarisse Zimra
Assia Djebar Djebar's first work to be published in English, this collection of three long stories, three short ones, and a theoretical post-face depicts the plight of urban Algerian women who have thrown off the shackles of colonialism only to face a posHColonial regime that denies and subjugates them even as it celebrates the liberation of men. Denounced in Algeria for its political criticism, Djebar's book quickly sold out its first printing of 15,000 copies in France and was hugely popular in Italy. Her stylistically innovative, lyrical stories address the cloistering of women, the implications of reticence, the connection of language to oppression, and the impact of war on both women and men. The afterword by Clarisse Zimra includes an illuminating interview with Djebar.
Object-Oriented Application Development Using Microsoft Visual Basic .NET
E. Reed Doke, John W. Satzinger, Susan Rebstock Williams, David Douglas Take the Object-oriented approach! Utilize Microsoft’s powerful new development language, Visual Basic .NET, to explore Object-oriented programming with Object-oriented system development. Perfect for the CIS/MIS student.
Who Rules America? Power and Politics
G. William Domhoff Drawing from a power elite perspective and the latest empirical data, Domhoff’s classic text is an invaluable tool for teaching students about how power operates in U.S. society.
The Count of Monte Cristo (Wordsworth Classics)
Alexandre Dumas
Towelhead: A Novel
Alicia Erian Thirteen-year-old Jasira wants what every girl wants: love and acceptance and the undivided attention of whoever she's with. And if she can¹t get that from her parents, then why not from her mother's boyfriend, or her father's muscle-bound neighbor, Mr. Vuoso? Alicia Erian¹s incandescent debut novel, Towelhead, will ring true for readers who remember the rarely poetic transition from childhood to young adulthood. Jasira is a creature of contradiction: both innocent (reading romantic intentions into the grossest displays of lust) and oddly clear-sighted, especially when it comes to the imbalance of power, and the things we do for love. When her mother exiles her to Houston to live with Jasira's strict, quick-to-anger Lebanese father, she quickly learns what aspects of herself to suppress in front of him. In private, however, she conducts her sexual awakening with all the false confidence that pop culture and her neighbor's Playboy magazines have provided.

Jasira tells her story with candor and glimmers of dark, unexpected humor—as when she describes her mother's boyfriend Barry's assistance in her personal grooming: "A week later, Barry broke down and told her the truth. That he had shaved me himself. That he had been shaving me for weeks. That he couldn't seem to stop shaving me." The freshness of her narrative voice sets Towelhead apart from the sentimental or purely harsh treatment of similar subject matter elsewhere, and makes the novel a promising follow-up to Erian¹s well-regarded short story collection, The Brutal Language of Love. —Regina Marler
The Virgin Suicides
Jeffrey Eugenides In the tradition of Bright Lights, Big City and The Secret History comes a compelling, highly-acclaimed debut novel of youth and innocence. On the elm-lined streets of a middle-class American city, the lives of a group of teenaged boys are forever changed by their obsession with five mysteriously doomed sisters.
Middlesex: A Novel
Jeffrey Eugenides "I was born twice: first, as a baby girl, on a remarkably smogless Detroit day in January of 1960; and then again, as a teenage boy, in an emergency room near Petoskey, Michigan, in August of 1974." And so begins Middlesex, the mesmerizing saga of a near-mythic Greek American family and the "roller-coaster ride of a single gene through time." The odd but utterly believable story of Cal Stephanides, and how this 41-year-old hermaphrodite was raised as Calliope, is at the tender heart of this long-awaited second novel from Jeffrey Eugenides, whose elegant and haunting 1993 debut, The Virgin Suicides, remains one of the finest first novels of recent memory.

Eugenides weaves together a kaleidoscopic narrative spanning 80 years of a stained family history, from a fateful incestuous union in a small town in early 1920s Asia Minor to Prohibition-era Detroit; from the early days of Ford Motors to the heated 1967 race riots; from the tony suburbs of Grosse Pointe and a confusing, aching adolescent love story to modern-day Berlin. Eugenides's command of the narrative is astonishing. He balances Cal/Callie's shifting voices convincingly, spinning this strange and often unsettling story with intelligence, insight, and generous amounts of humor:

Emotions, in my experience aren't covered by single words. I don't believe in "sadness," "joy," or "regret." … I'd like to have at my disposal complicated hybrid emotions, Germanic traincar constructions like, say, "the happiness that attends disaster." Or: "the disappointment of sleeping with one's fantasy." ... I'd like to have a word for "the sadness inspired by failing restaurants" as well as for "the excitement of getting a room with a minibar." I've never had the right words to describe my life, and now that I've entered my story, I need them more than ever.

When you get to the end of this splendorous book, when you suddenly realize that after hundreds of pages you have only a few more left to turn over, you'll experience a quick pang of regret knowing that your time with Cal is coming to a close, and you may even resist finishing it—putting it aside for an hour or two, or maybe overnight—just so that this wondrous, magical novel might never end. —Brad Thomas Parsons
Words On Solitude And Silence
Helen Exley Inspirational quotations
Pillars of Salt
Fadia Faqir Pillars of Salt is the story of two women confined in a mental hospital in Jordan during and after the British Mandate. Maha, a peasant woman from the Jordan Valley, and Um Saad from Amman find themselves sharing a room. After initial tensions they become friends and share their life stories.

Maha's version of history, which is told from the inside, is framed by the narrative of the storyteller who reports as an outsider. Maha's husband Harb was the love of her life but her devition to him does not survive the repression and violence of her husband bringing home a young new wife, Yusra.

The intricate structure of the novel with its different voices and interlacing narrative lines conforms to the ancient tradition of storytelling in Arabia. Both Muslim and Christian theological sources are used to create a mythical woman who is subjugated and confined by society. The apocalyptic vision of the novel refers to the continuing repression of Arab women whose daily contribution to the economy and struggle to survive in a male-dominated society have largely been neglected.
Arriba Comunicacion Y Cultura
Fernandez, Zayas-Bazan This book exemplifies learning the Spanish language within its cultural context—an approach that incorporates the products, perspectives, and practices important to understanding the Hispanic culture, while including the vocabulary and structures that are required to communicate within it. It contains fifteen lecciones, topically organized and designed to encourage communication and offer insight into the language and culture of over 300 million people. Chapter topics include Spanish names and nicknames; universities in Spanish speaking countries; shopping; reading advertisements; making travel arrangements; expressing wishes and daily routines; persuading others; exchanging money at the bank; and the media. For individuals interested in learning the culture behind the vocabulary and grammar of the Spanish language.
Why We Love: The Nature and Chemistry of Romantic Love
Helen Fisher "If you want flashes and particular experiences of romantic love, read novels. If you want to understand this central quality of human nature to its roots, read Why We Love."
—Edward O. Wilson

In Why We Love, renowned anthropologist Helen Fisher offers a new map of the phenomenon of love—from its origins in the brain to the thrilling havoc it creates in our bodies and behavior. Working with a team of scientists to scan the brains of people who had just fallen madly in love, Fisher proved what psychologists had until recently only suspected: when you fall in love, specific areas of the brain "light up" with increased blood flow. This sweeping new book uses this data to argue that romantic passion is hardwired into our brains by millions of years of evolution. It is not an emotion; it is a drive as powerful as hunger.

Provocative, enlightening, engaging, and persuasive, Why We Love offers radical new answers to age-old questions: what love is, who we love—and how to keep love alive.
White Oleander
Janet Fitch Oprah Book Club® Selection, May 1999: Astrid Magnussen, the teenage narrator of Janet Fitch's engrossing first novel, White Oleander, has a mother who is as sharp as a new knife. An uncompromising poet, Ingrid despises weakness and self-pity, telling her daughter that they are descendants of Vikings, savages who fought fiercely to survive. And when one of Ingrid's boyfriends abandons her, she illustrates her point, killing the man with the poison of oleander flowers. This leads to a life sentence in prison, leaving Astrid to teach herself the art of survival in a string of Los Angeles foster homes.

As Astrid bumps from trailer park to tract house to Hollywood bungalow, White Oleander uncoils her existential anxieties. "Who was I, really?" she asks. "I was the sole occupant of my mother's totalitarian state, my own personal history rewritten to fit the story she was telling that day. There were so many missing pieces." Fitch adroitly leads Astrid down a path of sorting out her past and identity. In the process, this girl develops a wire-tight inner strength, gains her mother's white-blonde beauty, and achieves some measure of control over their relationship. Even from prison, Ingrid tries to mold her daughter. Foiling her, Astrid learns about tenderness from one foster mother and how to stand up for herself from another. Like the weather in Los Angeles—the winds of the Santa Anas, the scorching heat—Astrid—Astrid's teenage life is intense. Fitch's novel deftly displays that, and also makes Astrid's life meaningful. —Katherine Anderson
Madame Bovary
Gustave Flaubert Novel in which a woman defies the standards of conventional French society.
Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close: A Novel
Jonathan Safran Foer Jonathan Safran Foer emerged as one of the most original writers of his generation with his best-selling debut novel, Everything Is Illuminated. Now, with humor, tenderness, and awe, he confronts the traumas of our recent history.

Nine-year-old Oskar Schell has embarked on an urgent, secret mission that will take him through the five boroughs of New York. His goal is to find the lock that matches a mysterious key that belonged to his father, who died in the World Trade Center on the morning of September 11. This seemingly impossible task will bring Oskar into contact with survivors of all sorts on an exhilarating, affecting, often hilarious, and ultimately healing journey.
500 Simple Website Hints, Tips, and Techniques: The Easy, All-in-one Guide to Those Inside Secrets for Building Better Websites
Jamie Freeman
An Introduction to Language
Victoria Fromkin, Robert Rodman, Nina Hyams AN INTRODUCTION TO LANGUAGE is ideal for use at all levels and in many different areas of instruction including education, languages, psychology, anthropology, teaching English as a Second Language (TESL), and linguistics. All chapters in this best-seller have been substantially revised to reflect recent discoveries and new understanding of linguistics and languages.
Sophie's World: A Novel About the History of Philosophy
Jostein Gaarder A page-turning novel that is also an exploration of the great philosophical concepts of Western thought, Sophie’s World has fired the imagination of readers all over the world, with more than twenty million copies in print.

One day fourteen-year-old Sophie Amundsen comes home from school to find in her mailbox two notes, with one question on each: “Who are you?” and “Where does the world come from?” From that irresistible beginning, Sophie becomes obsessed with questions that take her far beyond what she knows of her Norwegian village. Through those letters, she enrolls in a kind of correspondence course, covering Socrates to Sartre, with a mysterious philosopher, while receiving letters addressed to another girl. Who is Hilde? And why does her mail keep turning up? To unravel this riddle, Sophie must use the philosophy she is learning—but the truth turns out to be far more complicated than she could have imagined. Jostein Gaarder was born in Oslo, Norway, in 1952. He taught high-school philosophy for several years before publishing a collection of short stories in 1986 and, shortly thereafter, his first two novels, The Solitaire Mystery and Sophie's World, and several others since then. He lives in Oslo with his family. One day fourteen-year-old Sophie Amundsen comes home from school to find in her mailbox two notes, with one question on each: "Who are you?" and "Where does the world come from?" From that irresistible beginning, Sophie becomes obsessed with questions that take her far beyond what she knows of her Norwegian village. Through those letters, she enrolls in a kind of correspondence course, covering Socrates to Sartre, with a mysterious philosopher, while receiving letters addressed to another girl. Who is Hilde? And why does her mail keep turning up? To unravel this riddle, Sophie must use the philosophy she is learning—but the truth turns out to be far more complicated than she could have imagined. "First, think a beginner's guide to philosophy . . . Next, imagine a fantasy novel—something like a modern-day version of Through the Looking Glass. Meld these disparate genres, and what do you get? Well, what you get is an improbable international bestseller . . . [A] tour de force."—Time "First, think a beginner's guide to philosophy . . . Next, imagine a fantasy novel—something like a modern-day version of Through the Looking Glass. Meld these disparate genres, and what do you get? Well, what you get is an improbable international bestseller . . . [A] tour de force."—Time   "Extraordinary . . . The book will serve as a first-rate introduction to anyone who never took an introductory philosophy course, and as a pleasant refresher for those who have."—Newsweek   "Remarkable . . . A whimsical and ingenious mystery novel that also happens to be a history of philosophy."—The Washington Post Book World   "As remarkable for its playful premise as for its accessibility . . . The essential charm of Sophie's World lies in the innocent curiosity of the young character, and the clever narrative structure Gaarder designed to pique it."—Columbus Dispatch   "Brilliant . . . Unlike any other novel . . . Its depth of learning, its intelligence, and its totally original conception give it enormous magnetic appeal . . . To be fully human, and to feel our continuity with 3,000 years of philosophical inquiry, we need to put ourselves in Sophie's world."—Boston Sunday Globe   “Gaarder’s novel, brilliant in its philosophical scope and concision, narrates the intellectual maturation of its protagonist, Sophie Amundsen, a 14 year-old girl living in Norway . . . It is a wonderful source for a basic introduction to philosophy, especially for younger generations of readers who have already devoured J.K. Rowling’s and Philip Pullman’s books and who are looking for something else to satiate their desire for intellectual intrigue, mystery and adventure.”—Marcie Bianco, Feminist Review   "A simply wonderful, irresistible book . . . A cross between Bertrand Russell's History of Western Philosophy and Alice in Wonderland."—The Daily Telegraph [UK]   "A rare bird indeed, a short history of Western philosophical thought from Socrates to Sartre, coyly embedded in the wrapping of a suspense novel."—New York Newsday   "An entertaining brainteaser of a novel . . . Sophie thinks like a Platonist in the early part of the course, like an empiricist in the middle, and like an existentialist toward the end."—Books & Culture   "From the opening Goethe quotation to the closing discussion of the Big Bang theory, this is an extraordinary, exciting, provocative book . . . Gaarder presents a didactic history of philosophical thought as part of a fictional mystery story that both pulls readers along and breaks up the 'heavy' explanations into manageable parts. Yet the plot is itself a philosophical conundrum, [and this] mystery, like the human mystery, is not really resolved, and leaves readers wanting to know more. Gaarder pulls off the difficult feat of blending philosophy and entertainment in a way that will capture young adults' interest and make them eager to explore further."—School Library Journal
The Sand Fish: A Novel from Dubai
Maha Gargash A fascinating window into a different culture—and an inspiring and unforgettable universal story of strength and self-reliance—from an extraordinarily wise and lyrical new literary voice

Coming of age in the 1950s, seventeen-year-old Noora is unlike other women of the sun-battered mountains at the tip of the Arabian Peninsula. Though she shares their poverty and, like them, bears life's hardships without complaint, she is also fiery and independent. Following the death of her mother and her father's descent into dazed madness, Noora flees the threat of an arranged marriage, only to be driven back to her unwanted fate by disappointment and heartbreak. As the third wife to a rich, much older man, Noora struggles to adjust to her new home by the sea, thinking of herself as a sand fish—the desert lizard she observed in the mountains, which, when stuck in the wrong place and desperate to escape, smashed itself again and again into unyielding rocks. But then a light is shone into her miserable darkness, resulting in an unexpected passion, a shocking indiscretion, and a secret that could jeopardize Noora's life.
Married to a Bedouin
Marguerite van Geldermalsen New Zealand born nurse Marguerite van Geldermalsen first visited the lost city Petra with her friend Elizabeth in 1978 on a sightseeing tour of the ancient world. Already looking forward to her beach holiday at the end of the trip, little did Maguerite know she was about to meet the man she would marry, the charismatic Mohammad Abdallah Othman, a Bedouin craftsman of the Manajah tribe. A life with Mohammad meant moving into his ancient cave and learning to love the regular tasks of baking shrak bread on an open fire and collecting water from the spring. But as Marguerite feels herself becoming part of the Bedouin community, she is thankful for the twist in fate that has led her to this contented life. Marguerite’s light-hearted and guileless observations of the people she comes to love are as heart-warming as they are valuable, charting Bedouin traditions now lost to the modern world.
The Prophet
Kahlil Gibran In a distant, timeless place, a mysterious prophet walks the sands. At the moment of his departure, he wishes to offer the people gifts but possesses nothing. The people gather round, each asks a question of the heart, and the man's wisdom is his gift. It is Gibran's gift to us, as well, for Gibran's prophet is rivaled in his wisdom only by the founders of the world's great religions. On the most basic topics—marriage, children, friendship, work, pleasure—his words have a power and lucidity that in another era would surely have provoked the description "divinely inspired." Free of dogma, free of power structures and metaphysics, consider these poetic, moving aphorisms a 20th-century supplement to all sacred traditions—as millions of other readers already have. —Brian Bruya
The Twentieth Century: A Brief Global History
Richard Goff, Walter G Moss, Janice Terry, Jiu-Hwa Upshur Written by a diverse group of scholars who bring their regional expertise together, this unique and comprehensive text uses organization as a key tool to help students appreciate this important period in global history. Its clear prose weaves basic factual information and analysis to create a ‘student-friendly' text while still allowing for professors' personal interpretation. An introductory chapter introduces five key topics or themes whose influence on the various developments and events in the twentieth century are chronologically discussed throughout the text. More analysis, less detail and refined prose combine with new and retained features to make the 6th edition of 'The Twentieth Century: A Brief Global History' a best selling text for the 20th Century World course.
Stigma Notes on the Management of Spoiled Identity
Erving Goffman The dwarf, the disfigured, the blind man, the homosexual, the ex-mental patient and the member of a racial or religious minority all share one characteristic: they are all socially "abnormal", and therefore in danger of being considered less then human. Whether ordinary people react by rejection, by over-hearty acceptance or by plain embarressment, their main concern is with such an individual's deviance, not with the whole of his personality. "Stigma" is a study of situations where normal and abnormal meet, and of the ways in which a stigmatized person can develop a more positive social and personal identity.
'Isms & 'Ologies: All the Movements, Ideologies and Doctrines That Have Shaped Our World
Arthur Goldwag Have you ever wondered about the difference between Fundamentalism and Evangelicalism and which influenced the other? Do you know where Post-modernism stops and Post-structuralism begins? Would you like to?

From Platonism to New Historicism, humankind is constantly coming up with fresh schools of thought to help explain (or at least describe) the mysterious world around us. Here is the ultimate guide to over 450 of the most significant intellectual terms, movements, and religions that help shape the society we live in. Simply, concisely, and with personality, ‘Isms and ‘Ologies clarifies buzz terms like jihad, often defined as “holy war” but which literally means “striving” ;and illustrates the differences between Conservatism, Paleoconservatism, and Neoconservatism. It explains String Theory (which attempts to unify Quantum Mechanics and Einsteinian Relativity); describes Fauvism (an artistic movement that paved the way for Expressionism and Cubism); defines Locofocoism (an American political ideology named after a “self-lighting cigar)”; and identifies and explores so much more. Helpfully divided into categories–including politics, history, philosophy and the arts, economics, religion, science, and medicine–cross referenced, and thoroughly indexed, ‘Isms and ‘Ologies is a must have for the budding intellectual in everyone.
Communicating in Professional Contexts
H. L. Goodall, Sandra Goodall This new text and its accompanying CD-ROM, offers a distinct alternative to existing books for the business and professional communication course. Featuring coverage of the most up-to-date skill set available, the book reflects the rapid changes in professional communication due to the global economy, advances in information technology and an increasingly diverse work force. Using an engaging narrative style combined with the unique CCCD model (Choosing, Creating, Coordinating and Delivering) for building presentation competencies, and integrated Web and CD-ROM technology, the authors pay attention to skill building within a strong theoretical foundation of organizational communication. The unique CCCD model employed by the authors throughout the text consists of the following components: Choosing (a communication goal and strategy), Creating (the message), Coordinating (with other people), and Delivering (the message). The model provides students with a consistent formula in each chapter based on the same communication processes. Whether they are preparing an introduction, for an interview, for an informative presentation or for a persuasive presentation, students can use the model to prepare for, and improve upon, their performance.
Inline/Online: Fundamentals of the Internet & the World Wide Web
Raymond Greenlaw, Ellen Hepp In its second edition, Inline/Online: Fundamentals of the Internet and the World Wide Web continues to offer students an entertaining and pedagogically superior introduction to the Internet, Web Design, and HTML coding in textbook format. This new edition features enhanced coverage of FTP, discussion of a wider array of search engines, new material on cascading style sheets, and an expanded and up-to-the-minute presentation of the current state of e-commerce. Outside of the classroom, this book remains an excellent resource for anyone who is interested in recent computing developments, online information, and the Internet as the new social and economic frontier. Inline/Online distinguishes itself as a text by offering an in-depth treatment of the Internet for non-computer specialists, thus making it accessible to students from all majors. E-mail, Newsgroups/Mailing Lists, web programming, electronic publishing, and search engines are among the topics authors Ray Greenlaw and Ellen Hepp cover with flair and a sense of their relationship to real-world applications. Students begin by learning the basics of e-mail and by the end have the skills to publish their own well-designed web pages. In addition, the book contains over 500 exercises, many of them new to the second edition, which allow the reader test and refine their new skills online. An Online Learning Center accompanies the book and offers an array of supplementary materials such as HTML examples, useful links, and rendered code from the book. McGraw-Hill's Page Out allows professors to customize the site by including their own course syllabus, a list of students, grading information, assignments, projects, and more.
The Female Eunuch
Germaine Greer The publication of Germaine Greer's The Female Eunuch in 1970 was a landmark event, raising eyebrows and ire while creating a shock wave of recognition in women around the world with its steadfast assertion that sexual liberation is the key to women's liberation. Today, Greer's searing examination of the oppression of women in contemporary society is both an important historical record of where we've been and a shockingly relevant treatise on what still remains to be achieved.
The Norton Anthology of Literature by Women: The Traditions in English
Susan Gubar, Sandra M. Gilbert This edition has been expanded to extend coverage of the Renaissance, the 17th and 18th centuries, and the 20th century. The text also contains 11 complete works such as "Oroonoko", "Jane Eyre", "The Ballad of the Sad Cafe", "The Awakening" and Caryl Churchill's play, "Top Girls".
Sociological Theory: An Introduction to the Classical Tradition
Richard W. Hadden Sociological Theory presents a readable and easily understandable version of the central concepts and arguments of the great classical sociological theorists, Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, and Max Weber. The book begins by introducing the initial turn to sociological thought through a brief discussion of the Enlightenment, Conservative Reaction, Comte, and Spencer. From this sociological blend of liberal and conservative ideas the work moves to its core discussion of the varying accounts of modern society found in the rich works of Marx, Durkheim, and Weber. From Marx's reading of history and analysis of capitalism it moves through Durkheim's accounts of social solidarity and suicide to Weber's understanding of bureaucracy and of the religious foundations of the modern work ethic. It concludes with a succinct comparison of the three analyses of modern society.

Comments:

"Hadden's clear presentation of the often complex arguments of the classic European sociologists is most welcome. Although designed for the undergraduate student, this handy volume can be profitably read as a refresher by the professional sociologist as well." - Carol Copp, California State University, Fullerton

The late Richard W. Hadden was Associate Professor of Sociology at Saint Mary's University, Halifax. He is author of the award-winning On the Shoulders of Merchants: Exchange and the Mathematical Conception of Nature in Early Modern Europe (State University of New York, 1994).
The Reluctant Fundamentalist
Mohsin Hamid Mohsin Hamid's first novel, Moth Smoke, dealt with the confluence of personal and political themes, and his second, The Reluctant Fundamentalist, revisits that territory in the person of Changez, a young Pakistani. Told in a single monologue, the narrative never flags. Changez is by turns naive, sinister, unctuous, mildly threatening, overbearing, insulting, angry, resentful, and sad. He tells his story to a nameless, mysterious American who sits across from him at a Lahore cafe. Educated at Princeton, employed by a first-rate valuation firm, Changez was living the American dream, earning more money than he thought possible, caught up in the New York social scene and in love with a beautiful, wealthy, damaged girl. The romance is negligible; Erica is emotionally unavailable, endlessly grieving the death of her lifelong friend and boyfriend, Chris.

Changez is in Manila on 9/11 and sees the towers come down on TV. He tells the American, "...I smiled. Yes, despicable as it may sound, my initial reaction was to be remarkably pleased... I was caught up in the symbolism of it all, the fact that someone had so visibly brought America to her knees..." When he returns to New York, there is a palpable change in attitudes toward him, starting right at immigration. His name and his face render him suspect.

Ongoing trouble between Pakistan and India urge Changez to return home for a visit, despite his parents' advice to stay where he is. While there, he realizes that he has changed in a way that shames him. "I was struck at first by how shabby our house appeared... I was saddened to find it in such a state... This was where I came from... and it smacked of lowliness." He exorcises that feeling and once again appreciates his home for its "unmistakable personality and idiosyncratic charm." While at home, he lets his beard grow. Advised to shave it, even by his mother, he refuses. It will be his line in the sand, his statement about who he is. His company sends him to Chile for another business valuation; his mind filled with the troubles in Pakistan and the U.S. involvement with India that keeps the pressure on. His work and the money he earns have been overtaken by resentment of the United States and all it stands for.

Hamid's prose is filled with insight, subtly delivered: "I felt my age: an almost childlike twenty-two, rather than that permanent middle-age that attaches itself to the man who lives alone and supports himself by wearing a suit in a city not of his birth." In telling of the janissaries, Christian boys captured by Ottomans and trained to be soldiers in the Muslim Army, his Chilean host tells him: "The janissaries were always taken in childhood. It would have been far more difficult to devote themselves to their adopted empire, you see, if they had memories they could not forget." Changez cannot forget, and Hamid makes the reader understand that—and all that follows. —Valerie Ryan

A Conversation with Mohsin Hamid
Set in modern-day Pakistan, Mohsin Hamid's debut novel, Moth Smoke, went on to win awards and was listed as a New York Times Notable Book of the Year. His bold new novel, The Reluctant Fundamentalist, is a daring, fast-paced monologue of a young Pakistani man telling his life story to a mysterious American stranger. It's a controversial look at the dark side of the American Dream, exploring the aftermath of 9/11, international unease, and the dangerous pull of nostalgia. Amazon.com senior editor Brad Thomas Parsons shared an e-mail exchange with Mohsin Hamid to talk about his powerful new book

Read the Amazon.com Interview with Mohsin Hamid
Ancient Egypt
George Hart Eyewitness Books' Ancient Egypt continues the tradition of excellent, accurate, and beautiful reference works for kids 9 to 12 years old. Ancient Egyptian civilization holds a special fascination for many, with its mummies, pyramids, and highly stylized artworks. Kids can explore a Pharaoh's tomb, see a mummy up close, and find out about Egyptian gods. Lots of archaeological relics show what life was like for the ancient Egyptians, from how they dressed to the games they played.
Modern Banking in Theory and Practice
Shelagh Heffernan The banking world is changing rapidly. The strategic priority has shifted away from growth and size alone towards a greater emphasis on profitability, performance and ‘value creation within the banking firm. Bank professionals now require a thorough grounding in the micro foundations of banking if they are to make important managerial decisions, or implement banking policies. Containing up-to-date case studies, this book is concerned with the theory and practice of banking now, and the prospects for the future. Unlike many other books in this area, this text is devoted to the micro issues of banking, including competition, structure, performance, risks and regulation. "…rigorous, topical and it provides a good insight into some of the major empirical and policy research fields of modern banking … an important and stimulating contribution to the micro banking literature. It should be required reading for banking students, researchers, banking professionals, and all who are interested in modern banks and banking." Edward Gardener, Institute of European Finance, University of Wales, Bangor, UK "… it takes an international approach to the subject of banking and combines that perspective with the more conventional aspects of the subject treated in a modern textbook. … the writing is clear and concise … I think you have a winner in this book." Ingo Walter, New York University Salomon Center, USA
Marketing: Best Practices
K. Douglas Hoffman, Michael R. Czinkota, Peter R. Dickson, Patrick Dunne, Abbie Griffin Seventeen experts, one voice! The premise behind Marketing: Best Practices is simple yet effective: combine the expertise of the best and brightest in marketing. The second edition continues the tradition of highlighting the best practices from every facet of marketing. Each chapter is written by an authority in their field of marketing, all of whom are highly regarded for both academic and professional achievements. This unique collaboration results in one of the most cutting-edge texts to hit the principles market in years.Dr. Doug Hoffman, in addition to his chapter on Services Marketing, served as managing editor to ensure a focused and streamlined presentation throughout the book. Without losing the distinct flavor of each contributing author, every chapter is consistent in both format and pedagogy. The writing style is uniform and targeted for the undergraduate level. Cutting-edge topics drive the Opening Vignettes, and the copy maintains a lively, energetic tone. The end result is a solid mix of passion, insight, and firsthand experience not typically found in more traditional "Principles of Marketing" textbooks.
Music for Torching
A. M. Homes As Quentin Crisp used to say, "Don't keep up with the Joneses! Drag them down to your level!" This could be the motto of the suburbanites in A.M. Homes's fourth novel, Music for Torching. Homes has a subtle eye and ear for suburban reality, but beware: she is no mere satirist of what James Joyce called the "muddle crass." Behind each neat, bright lawn, vile lives writhe in darkness. On the surface, Paul and Elaine are conventionally competitive middle-aged, middle-class people with banal yearnings for French doors and a new deck. They have two strapping boys. Their neighbors Pat and George are prodigies of efficient family life. But alone with Elaine, Pat drops the Stepford Wife mask and stages loveless orgies atop the throbbing washer, amid the Downy and Fantastik and Bon Ami. Meanwhile, Paul beds a local wife and a sinister mistress. The nice old man down the street downloads Internet child porn. Local kids join the Boy Scouts and bite off teachers' fingers. It's all about lurid misery and false fronts: a minor character is named Claire Roth, surely alluding to the bitter relationship in Claire Bloom's Leaving a Doll's House and Philip Roth's I Married a Communist.

Paul and Elaine first popped up in Homes's collection The Safety of Objects, as a couple having the happiest night of their lives smoking crack while the kids are away. Their happiest night here is when they tip the barbecue and burn their house halfway down. The story proceeds with a nightmare zombie logic from there, with a funny-scary ironic tone. "Paul notices that the color of her eye shadow is Fiction, and her lipstick is called Sheer Fraud.... 'What happened to the dining-room table, Elaine? Why'd you chop it to pieces?'" he wonders. "The damage was irreparable," his wife replies. Homes describes nice people doing not-so-nice deeds in luminous, precise prose way better than Bret Easton Ellis, as well as Joyce Carol Oates, and occasionally within range of John Updike. But Homes is really the evil spawn of Grace Metalious and Quentin Tarantino. —Tim Appelo
Safety of Objects
A. M. Homes Published to overwhelming critical acclaim, this extraordinary collection of short stories established A. M. Homes as one of the most provocative and daring writers of her generation. Here you'll find the cult classic "A Real Doll," the tale of a teenage boy's erotic obsession with his sister's favorite doll; "Adults Alone," which first introduced Paul and Elaine, the crack-smoking yuppie couple whose marriage careens out of control in Homes's novel Music for Torching; and "Looking for Johnny," in which a kidnapped boy, having failed his abductor's expectations, is returned home.

Brilliantly conceived, sharply etched, and exceptionally satisfying, these stories explore the American dream in ways you're not likely soon to forget. Working in Kodacolor hues, Homes offers an uncanny picture of a surreal suburbia-outrageous and utterly believable.
Beginning Visual C++ 6
Ivor Horton "Windows programming is not difficult," observes well-respected author Ivor Horton in his book Beginning Visual C++ 6. "In fact, Microsoft Visual C++ 6.0 makes it remarkably easy." Horton's treatment of Visual C++ continues the expert author's thorough and patient presentation of the best of today's object-oriented computer languages. (Besides C++, the author has written the excellent Beginning Java for Java developers). This massive, yet quite comprehensible, tutorial covers all the essential features of C++ used with Microsoft Visual C++ 6. Horton's book is the ideal choice for programmers who don't want to skimp on their general knowledge of C++. The author covers all the bases here in a title that will certainly compare favorably with any other Visual C++ tutorial on the market today. —Richard Dragan
A Thousand Splendid Suns
Khaled Hosseini After more than 189 weeks on the New York Times bestseller list for The Kite Runner, Khaled Hosseini returns with a beautiful, riveting, and haunting novel that confirms his place as one of the most important literary writers today.

Propelled by the same superb instinct for storytelling that made The Kite Runner a beloved classic, A Thousand Splendid Suns is at once an incredible chronicle of thirty years of Afghan history and a deeply moving story of family, friendship, faith, and the salvation to be found in love.

Born a generation apart and with very different ideas about love and family, Mariam and Laila are two women brought jarringly together by war, by loss and by fate. As they endure the ever escalating dangers around them-in their home as well as in the streets of Kabul-they come to form a bond that makes them both sisters and mother-daughter to each other, and that will ultimately alter the course not just of their own lives but of the next generation. With heart-wrenching power and suspense, Hosseini shows how a woman's love for her family can move her to shocking and heroic acts of self-sacrifice, and that in the end it is love, or even the memory of love, that is often the key to survival.

A stunning accomplishment, A Thousand Splendid Suns is a haunting, heartbreaking, compelling story of an unforgiving time, an unlikely friendship, and an indestructible love
Semantics: A Coursebook
James R. Hurford, Brendan Heasley, Michael B. Smith This practical coursebook introduces all the basics of semantics in a simple, step-by-step fashion. Each unit includes short sections of explanation with examples, followed by stimulating practice exercises to complete in the book. Feedback and comment sections follow each exercise to enable students to monitor their progress. No previous background in semantics is assumed, as students begin by discovering the value and fascination of the subject and then move through all key topics in the field, including sense and reference, simple logic, word meaning and interpersonal meaning. New study guides and exercises have been added to the end of each unit to help reinforce and test learning. A completely new unit on non-literal language and metaphor, plus updates throughout the text significantly expand the scope of the original edition to bring it up-to-date with modern teaching of semantics for introductory courses in linguistics as well as intermediate students.
Brave New World
Aldous Huxley "Community, Identity, Stability" is the motto of Aldous Huxley's utopian World State. Here everyone consumes daily grams of soma, to fight depression, babies are born in laboratories, and the most popular form of entertainment is a "Feelie," a movie that stimulates the senses of sight, hearing, and touch. Though there is no violence and everyone is provided for, Bernard Marx feels something is missing and senses his relationship with a young women has the potential to be much more than the confines of their existence allow. Huxley foreshadowed many of the practices and gadgets we take for granted today—let—let's hope the sterility and absence of individuality he predicted aren't yet to come.
Brave New World
Aldous Huxley "Community, Identity, Stability" is the motto of Aldous Huxley's utopian World State. Here everyone consumes daily grams of soma, to fight depression, babies are born in laboratories, and the most popular form of entertainment is a "Feelie," a movie that stimulates the senses of sight, hearing, and touch. Though there is no violence and everyone is provided for, Bernard Marx feels something is missing and senses his relationship with a young women has the potential to be much more than the confines of their existence allow. Huxley foreshadowed many of the practices and gadgets we take for granted today—let—let's hope the sterility and absence of individuality he predicted aren't yet to come.
A Doll's House
Henrik Ibsen One of the best-known, most frequently performed of modern plays, displaying Ibsen’s genius for realistic prose drama. A classic expression of women’s rights, the play builds to a climax in which the central character, Nora, rejects a smothering marriage and life in "a doll’s house." Publisher’s Note. Contents. Dramatis Personae.
The Dangerous Book For Boys
Conn Iggulden, Hal Iggulden
The Friday Night Knitting Club
Kate Jacobs The New York Times bestselling sensation that's "Steel Magnolias set in Manhattan" (USA Today)-now in paperback.

Juggling the demands of her yarn shop and single-handedly raising a teenage daughter has made Georgia Walker grateful for her Friday Night Knitting Club. Her friends are happy to escape their lives too, even for just a few hours. But when Georgia's ex suddenly reappears, demanding a role in their daughter's life, her whole world is shattered.

Luckily, Georgia's friends are there, sharing their own tales of intimacy, heartbreak, and miracle making. And when the unthinkable happens, these women will discover that what they've created isn't just a knitting club: it's a sisterhood.
Washington Square
Henry James, Philip Horne, Professor Martha Banta When timid and plain Catherine Sloper acquires a dashing and determined suitor, her father, convinced that the young man is nothing more than a fortune-hunter, decides to put a stop to their romance. Torn between her desire to win her father's love and approval and her passion for the first man who has ever declared his love for her, Catherine faces an agonising dilemma, and becomes all too aware of the restrictions that others seek to place on her freedom. James' masterly novel deftly interweaves the public and private faces of nineteenth-century New York society; it is also a deeply moving study of innocence destroyed.
Daisy Miller
Henry James, David Lodge, Philip Horne Travelling in Europe with her family, Daisy Miller, an exquisitely beautiful young American woman, presents her fellow-countryman Winterbourne with a dilemma he cannot resolve. Is she deliberately flouting social convention in the outspoken way she talks and acts, or is she simply ignorant of those conventions? When she strikes up an intimate friendship with an urbane young Italian, her flat refusal to observe the codes of respectable behaviour leave her perilously exposed. In "Daisy Miller" James created his first great portrait of the enigmatic and dangerously independent American woman, a figure who would come to dominate his later masterpieces.
A Map of Home: A Novel
Randa Jarrar From America to the Middle East and back again- the sparkling story of one girl's childhood, by an exciting new voice in literary fiction

In this fresh, funny, and fearless debut novel, Randa Jarrar chronicles the coming-of-age of Nidali, one of the most unique and irrepressible narrators in contemporary fiction. Born in 1970s Boston to an Egyptian-Greek mother and a Palestinian father, the rebellious Nidali-whose name is a feminization of the word "struggle"-soon moves to a very different life in Kuwait. There the family leads a mildly eccentric middle-class existence until the Iraqi invasion drives them first to Egypt and then to Texas. This critically acclaimed debut novel is set to capture the hearts of everyone who has ever wondered what their own map of home might look like.
The Noodle Maker: A Novel
Ma Jian From Mi Jian, the highly acclaimed Chinese dissident, comes a satirical novel about the absurdities of life in a post-Tiananmen China.

Two men meet for dinner each week. Over the course of one of these drunken evenings, the writer recounts the stories he would write, had he the courage: a young man buys an old kiln and opens a private crematorium, delighting in his ability to harass the corpses of police officers and Party secretaries, while swooning to banned Western music; a heartbroken actress performs a public suicide by stepping into the jaws of a wild tiger, watched nonchalantly by her ex-lover. Extraordinary characters inspire him, their lives pulled and pummeled by fate and politics, as if they are balls of dough in the hands of an all-powerful noodle maker.

Ma Jian's satirical masterpiece allows us a humorous, yet profound, glimpse of those struggling to survive under a system that dictates their every move. Ma Jian left Beijing for Hong Kong in 1987, shortly before his books were banned in China. He now lives in London. His acclaimed book Red Dust won the 2002 Thomas Cook Travel Book Award. Two men, one a writer of political propaganda, the other a professional blood donor, meet for dinner each week. Over the course of one drunken evening, the writer recounts the stories he would create, had he the courage: a young man buys an old kiln from an art school, opens a private crematorium, and is overwhelmed by demand; a heartbroken actress performs a public suicide by stepping into the jaws of a wild tiger, watched nonchalantly by her ex-lover; an illegal migrant scrapes together a living by writing love letters for the illiterate but can't help falling in love himself. Extraordinary characters inspire the writer, their lives pulled and pummeled by fate and politics as if they were balls of dough in the hands of an all-powerful noodle maker.

This satirical novel about the absurdities and cruelties of life in a post-Tiananmen China allows readers a humorous yet profound glimpse of individuals struggling to survive under a system that dictates their every move. "Fans of the absurdity and dark humor of Milan Kundera's portraits of life behind the Iron Curtain will appreciate these same elements in Ma Jian's work."—Alane Salierno Mason, The Baltimore Sun "[A] wry, biting collection."—Anderson Tepper, The New York Times Book Review

"Jian is a superb comedian . . . This antic nihilist is hard to beat."—Los Angeles Times

"[A] sharp, black comic novel . . . [An] excellent novel, and one China with have to answer for itself."—Bryan Walsh, Bookforum

"Fans of the absurdity and dark humor of Milan Kundera's portraits of life behind the Iron Curtain will appreciate these same elements in Ma Jian's work."—Alane Salierno Mason, The Baltimore Sun

"One of the most important and courageous voices in Chinese literature."—Gao Xingjian, winner of the 2000 Nobel Prize in Literature

"Playful and wonderfully dark, The Noodle Maker confirms Ma Jian as a Chinese Kundera. The funniest book I've read in a long time."—Philip Marsden, author of The Bronski House

"[Ma Jian's] writing shines a light that is both humane and angry into some of the dustiest corners of a closed and often forgotten society."—Stephanie Merritt, The Observer (London)

"The Noodle Maker is hugely entertaining and deeply serious. It's something to celebrate."—Jonathan Safran Foer, author of Everything is Illuminated
Stick Out Your Tongue
Ma Jian A new collection of short stories, set in Tibet, from one of China’s foremost writers — the author of Red Dust. With its publication in English, readers get a rare glimpse of Tibet through Chinese eyes.

From the Hardcover edition.
Almost Single
Advaita Kala In a city where old is meeting new, daughters are surprising mothers, and love is breaking all the rules, this heartfelt and wickedly funny cross-cultural debut novel introduces a young woman searching for independence and matrimony in a culture bound by tradition.

Between elegant soirees and the occasional mortifying mishap, Aisha Bhatia’s job as guest relations manager at New Delhi’s five-star Grand Orchid Hotel is intermittently fabulous—she certainly knows her wines and cheeses. But despite a life filled with good friends and first-class travel accommodations, the fact is that not many twenty-nine-year-old women in India are single—as Aisha’s mother never fails to remind her. Somewhere a clock is ticking, though as far as Aisha is concerned, it can be cheerfully drowned out by laughter over a champagne brunch. Yet when the handsomely chiseled Karan Verma arrives from New York, Aisha experiences an unexpected attitude adjustment. Karan is everything she’s ever wanted…that is, if she actually knew what she wanted. Is it possible that she’s about to find out?
In Search of Fatima: A Palestinian Story
Ghada Karmi No memoir of life as a diaspora Palestinian has been as personal and intimate as Ghada Karmi’s. Taking the reader through her childhood in Palestine, her flight to Britain after the catastrophe of 1948, and her coming of age in the coffee bars of Golders Green – the middle-class Jewish quarter in North London – Karmi reminds us of the adversities faced by those born in Palestine and, in tracing out her life beyond Palestinian borders, hints at the hardships that continue to plague those that remained in her mother country. Yet it is with a gentle humor that she describes the bizarre and sometimes tense realities that mask her life in “Little Tel Aviv” and, later, her struggle, like that of many other women in the late-fifties, to get a university grant to study medicine. Karmi’s straightforward yet poignant tone is a revelatory glance into the Palestinian exile experience.
Urawaza: Secret Everyday Tips and Tricks from Japan
Lisa Katayama Japan has a way of thinking that is just . . . different. Nowhere is this more apparent than in Tokyo-born journalist Lisa Katayama's collection of urawaza (a Japanese word for secret lifestyle tricks and techniques). Want to turbocharge your sled? Spray the bottom with nonstick cooking spray. Can't find someone to water your plants while you're away? Place the plant on a water-soaked diaper, so it slowly absorbs water over time. The subject of popular TV shows and numerous books in Japan, these unusually clever solutions to everyday problems have never before been published in English until now! Urawaza collects more than 100 once-secret tricks, offering step-by-step directions and explanations in an eye-catching package as unconventional as its contents.
Programming Flex 3: The Comprehensive Guide to Creating Rich Internet Applications with Adobe Flex
Chafic Kazoun, Joey Lott If you want to try your hand at developing rich Internet applications with Adobe's Flex 3, and already have experience with frameworks such as .NET or Java, this is the ideal book to get you started. Programming Flex 3 gives you a solid understanding of Flex 3's core concepts, and valuable insight into how, why, and when to use specific Flex features. Numerous examples and sample code demonstrate ways to build complete, functional applications for the Web, using the free Flex SDK, and RIAs for the desktop, using Adobe AIR. This book is an excellent companion to Adobe's Flex 3 reference documentation. With this book, you will:

Learn the underlying details of the Flex framework Program with MXML and ActionScript Arrange the layout and deal with UI components Work with media Manage state for applications and components Use transitions and effects Debug your Flex applications Create custom components Embed Flex applications in web browsers Build AIR applications for the desktop

Flex 3 will put you at the forefront of the RIA revolution on both the Web and the desktop. Programming Flex 3 will help you get the most from this amazing and sophisticated technology.
Literature: An Introduction to Fiction, Poetry, and Drama
X. J. Kennedy, Dana Gioia Literature, 7/e, the most popular introduction of its kind, is organized into three genres - Fiction, Poetry, and Drama. This edition reflects a balance of classic works along with contemporary and non-Western authors. As in past editions, the authors' collective poetic voice brings personal warmth and a human perspective to the discussion of literature, adding to students' interest in the readings. In this edition, the coverage of writing about literature is enhanced through Writing Critically sections in every major chapter.
The Secret Life of Bees
Sue Monk Kidd In Sue Monk Kidd's The Secret Life of Bees, 14-year-old Lily Owen, neglected by her father and isolated on their South Carolina peach farm, spends hours imagining a blissful infancy when she was loved and nurtured by her mother, Deborah, whom she barely remembers. These consoling fantasies are her heart's answer to the family story that as a child, in unclear circumstances, Lily accidentally shot and killed her mother. All Lily has left of Deborah is a strange image of a Black Madonna, with the words "Tiburon, South Carolina" scrawled on the back. The search for a mother, and the need to mother oneself, are crucial elements in this well-written coming-of-age story set in the early 1960s against a background of racial violence and unrest. When Lily's beloved nanny, Rosaleen, manages to insult a group of angry white men on her way to register to vote and has to skip town, Lily takes the opportunity to go with her, fleeing to the only place she can think of—Tiburon, South Carolina—determined to find out more about her dead mother. Although the plot threads are too neatly trimmed, The Secret Life of Bees is a carefully crafted novel with an inspired depiction of character. The legend of the Black Madonna and the brave, kind, peculiar women who perpetuate Lily's story dominate the second half of the book, placing Kidd's debut novel squarely in the honored tradition of the Southern Gothic. —Regina Marler
Misery
Stephen King In Misery (1987), as in The Shining (1977), a writer is trapped in an evil house during a Colorado winter. Each novel bristles with claustrophobia, stinging insects, and the threat of a lethal explosion. Each is about a writer faced with the dominating monster of his unpredictable muse.

Paul Sheldon, the hero of Misery, sees himself as a caged parrot who must return to Africa in order to be free. Thus, in the novel within a novel, the romance novel that his mad captor-nurse, Annie Wilkes, forces him to write, he goes to Africa—a mysterious continent that evokes for him the frightening, implacable solidity of a woman's (Annie's) body. The manuscript fragments he produces tell of a great Bee Goddess, an African queen reminiscent of H. Rider Haggard's She.

He hates her, he fears her, he wants to kill her; but all the same he needs her power. Annie Wilkes literally breathes life into him.

Misery touches on several large themes: the state of possession by an evil being, the idea that art is an act in which the artist willingly becomes captive, the tortured condition of being a writer, and the fears attendant to becoming a "brand-name" bestselling author with legions of zealous fans. And yet it's a tight, highly resonant echo chamber of a book—one of King's shortest, and best novels ever. —Fiona Webster
Flip Dictionary
Barbara Ann Kipfer You know what you want to say, but you can't think of the word. You can describe what you're thinking but you don't know the name for it. Flip Dictionary comes to the rescue!

Best-selling author Barbara Ann Kipfer has created a huge reference that offers cues and clue words to lead writers to the exact phrase or specific term they need. It goes beyond the standard reverse dictionary format to offer dozens of charts and tables, listing groups by subject (such as automobiles, clothing types, plants, tools, etc.)

For example: want to know the term for the curved wooden beams that form the ribs of a ship? Look in the alphabetical listing to find "ship, curved timbers forming rib of: futtock." Then look at the table of sailing terms to find the names of other parts of a ship, as well as types of ships.

Flip Dictionary is an excellent reference for everyone. Writers of fiction and non-fiction will use it to find that elusive word they need, and word lovers will find it an entertaining book to simply sit and browse through. Crossword puzzlers will also find it invaluable. An indispensable desk reference, as necessary as a dictionary or thesaurus, but a whole lot more fun.
The Female Thing: Dirt, envy, sex, vulnerability
Laura Kipnis From the author of the acclaimed Against Love comes a pointed, audacious, and witty examination of the state of the female psyche in the post-post-feminist world of the twenty-first century.

Women remain caught between feminism and femininity, between self-affirmation and an endless quest for self-improvement, between playing an injured party and claiming independence. Rather than blaming the usual suspects–men, the media–Kipnis takes a hard look at culprits closer to home, namely women themselves. Kipnis serves up the gory details of the mutual displeasure between men and women in painfully hilarious detail.

Is anatomy destiny after all? An ambitious and original reassessment of feminism and women’s ambivalence about it, The Female Thing breathes provocative new life into that age-old question.
Why You Act the Way You Do
Tim LaHaye Readers discover how temperament affects their work, emotions, spiritual life, and relationships and learn how to make improvements.

Spanish available
Armchair Economist: Economics & Everyday Life
Steven E. Landsburg Witty economists are about as easy to find as anorexic mezzo-sopranos, natty mujahedeen, and cheerful Philadelphians. But Steven E. Landsburg...is one economist who fits the bill. In a wide-ranging, easily digested, unbelievably contrarian survey of everything from why popcorn at movie houses costs so much to why recycling may actually reduce the number of trees on the planet, the University of Rochester professor valiantly turns the discussion of vexing economic questions into an activity that ordinary people might enjoy.
— Joe Queenan, The Wall Street Journal

The Armchair Economist is a wonderful little book, written by someone for whom English is a first (and beloved) language, and it contains not a single graph or equation...Landsburg presents fascinating concepts in a form easily accessible to noneconomists.
— Erik M. Jensen, The Cleveland Plain Dealer

...enormous fun from its opening page...Landsburg has done something extraordinary: He has expounded basic economic principles with wit and verve.
— Dan Seligman, Fortune
Lady Chatterley's Lover
D. H. Lawrence In Lady Chatterley's Lover, Lawrence argues for individual regeneration, which can be found only through the relationship between man and woman (and, he asserts sometimes, man and man). Love and personal relationships are the threads that bind this novel together. Lawrence explores a wide range of different types of relationships. The reader sees the brutal, bullying relationship between Mellors and his wife Bertha, who punishes him by preventing his pleasure. There is Tommy Dukes, who has no relationship because he cannot find a woman who he respects intellectually and at the same time finds desirable. There is also the perverse, maternal relationship that ultimately develops between Clifford and Mrs. Bolton after Connie has left. Masterful written, one of the most important novels of all time.
To Kill a Mockingbird
Harper Lee "When he was nearly thirteen, my brother Jem got his arm badly broken at the elbow.... When enough years had gone by to enable us to look back on them, we sometimes discussed the events leading to his accident. I maintain that the Ewells started it all, but Jem, who was four years my senior, said it started long before that. He said it began the summer Dill came to us, when Dill first gave us the idea of making Boo Radley come out."

Set in the small Southern town of Maycomb, Alabama, during the Depression, To Kill a Mockingbird follows three years in the life of 8-year-old Scout Finch, her brother, Jem, and their father, Atticus—three years punctuated by the arrest and eventual trial of a young black man accused of raping a white woman. Though her story explores big themes, Harper Lee chooses to tell it through the eyes of a child. The result is a tough and tender novel of race, class, justice, and the pain of growing up.

Like the slow-moving occupants of her fictional town, Lee takes her time getting to the heart of her tale; we first meet the Finches the summer before Scout's first year at school. She, her brother, and Dill Harris, a boy who spends the summers with his aunt in Maycomb, while away the hours reenacting scenes from Dracula and plotting ways to get a peek at the town bogeyman, Boo Radley. At first the circumstances surrounding the alleged rape of Mayella Ewell, the daughter of a drunk and violent white farmer, barely penetrate the children's consciousness. Then Atticus is called on to defend the accused, Tom Robinson, and soon Scout and Jem find themselves caught up in events beyond their understanding. During the trial, the town exhibits its ugly side, but Lee offers plenty of counterbalance as well—in the struggle of an elderly woman to overcome her morphine habit before she dies; in the heroism of Atticus Finch, standing up for what he knows is right; and finally in Scout's hard-won understanding that most people are essentially kind "when you really see them." By turns funny, wise, and heartbreaking, To Kill a Mockingbird is one classic that continues to speak to new generations, and deserves to be reread often. —Alix Wilber
Dead Girls
Nancy Lee Subtly linked by the background narrative of a murderer's arrest in Vancouver, the stories in this collection inhabit a dark, urban landscape as they journey into the realm of desperate relationships, of power and impulse, emotional wagers and negotiations.
The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism
Vincent Leitch, William Cain, Laurie Anne Finke, Barbara Johnson The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism presents a staggeringly varied collection of the most influential critical statements from the classical era to the present day. Edited by scholars and teachers whose interests range from the history of poetics to postmodernism, from classical rhetoric to ériture féminine, and from the social construction of gender to the machinery of academic superstardom, The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism promises to become the standard anthology in its field.

An Unrivaled Collection: The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism offers nearly twice the number of selections in other leading anthologies and more twentieth-century selections than any other text (including anthologies devoted solely to the twentieth century). This historical breadth of coverage and depth of selection—especially within the twentieth century—make The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism the perfect choice for nearly any theory and criticism course.

Continuity and Connections: The works in The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism have been chosen not only because they are individually important but also because they speak to each other, providing students with a rich portrait of the ongoing "critical conversation." Where appropriate, the editors link classical, medieval, and early modern critics to contemporary theorists and movements as well as to other classical, medieval, and early modern critics. Throughout the twentieth-century selections, the editors trace the complex web of interrelated ideas and explicit influences.

Helpful Apparatus:

• General Introduction: A 30-page introduction surveys the history of criticism and theory and provides an overview of the many schools and movements that make up the contemporary theoretical landscape.

• Headnotes: Each of the 169 figures represented in The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism is treated in an informative headnote that not only introduces the writer's life and thought but also connects the writer to other critics, theorists, and movements.

• Bibliographies: Each author headnote is followed by a selected bibliography. A detailed, annotated general bibliography at the end of the volume is divided into historical periods and major schools and movements. This material makes The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism a valuable reference for scholars as well as a useful teaching anthology.

• Annotations: In the Norton tradition, The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism's annotations are extensive, helpful, and as unobtrusive to students' own interpretive work as possible.
The Four Loves
C.S. Lewis A candid, wise, and warmly personal book in which Lewis explores the possibilities and problems of the four basic kinds of human love- affection, friendship, erotic love, and the love of God. “Immensely worthwhile for its simplicity...a rare and memorable book” (Sydney J. Harris).
Financial Accounting
Robert Libby, Patricia A. Libby, Daniel G. Short The authors wrote this text based on their belief that the subject of financial accounting is inherently interesting, but financial textbooks are often not. They believe most financial accounting textbooks fail to demonstrate that accounting is an exciting field of study and one that is important to future careers in business. When writing this text, they considered career relevance as their guide when selecting material, and the need to engage the student as their guide to style, pedagogy, and design.

Libby/Libby/Short is the only financial accounting text to successfully implement a real-world, single focus company approach in every chapter. Students and instructors have responded very favorably to the use of focus companies and the real world financial statements. The companies chosen are interesting and the decision-making focus shows the relevance of financial accounting regardless of whether the student has chosen to major in accounting.

This text has enjoyed tremendous success, and will continue to do so because of its timely, real world and relevant content, its solid pedagogical features, and its appropriate balance of innovative and traditional content.
Aunt Julia and the Scriptwriter
Mario Vargos Llosa, Mario Vargas Llosa Explores the tragicomic relationship between two artists and their material. While each feeds off the other, the narratives of Mario are nourished by the life around him, those of Camacho by the fantasies engendered by his disintegrating mind. The author's other works include "The Storyteller".
Beyond Identity Politics: Feminism, Power and Politics
Dr Moya Lloyd Recent debates in contemporary feminist theory have been dominated by the relation between identity and politics. Beyond Identity Politics examines the implications of recent theorizing on difference, identity and subjectivity for theories of patriarchy and feminist politics.

Organised around the three central themes of subjectivity, power and politics, this book focuses on a question which feminists struggled with and were divided by throughout the last decade, that is: how to theorize the relation between the subject and politics. In this thoughtful engagement with these debates Moya Lloyd argues that the turn to the subject in process does not entail the demise of feminist politics as many feminists have argued. She demonstrates how key ideas such as agency, power and domination take on a new shape as a consequence of this radical rethinking of the subject-politics relation and how the role of feminist political theory becomes centred upon critique.

A resource for feminist theorists, women's and gender studies students, as well as political and social theorists, this is a carefully composed and wide-ranging text, which provides important insights into one of contemporary feminism's most central concerns.
The Giver
Lois Lowry In a world with no poverty, no crime, no sickness and no unemployment, and where every family is happy, 12-year-old Jonas is chosen to be the community's Receiver of Memories. Under the tutelage of the Elders and an old man known as the Giver, he discovers the disturbing truth about his utopian world and struggles against the weight of its hypocrisy. With echoes of Brave New World, in this 1994 Newbery Medal winner, Lowry examines the idea that people might freely choose to give up their humanity in order to create a more stable society. Gradually Jonas learns just how costly this ordered and pain-free society can be, and boldly decides he cannot pay the price.
The Uses and Abuses of History
Margaret MacMillan The past is capricious enough to support every stance - no matter how questionable. In 2002, the Bush administration decided that dealing with Saddam Hussein was like appeasing Hitler or Mussolini, and promptly invaded Iraq. Were they wrong to look to history for guidance? No; their mistake was to exaggerate one of its lessons while suppressing others of equal importance. History is often hijacked through suppression, manipulation, and, sometimes, even outright deception. MacMillan's book is packed full of examples of the abuses of history. In response, she urges us to treat the past with care and respect.
Falling Leaves: The Memoir of an Unwanted Chinese Daughter
Adeline Yen Mah Snow White's stepmother looks like a pussycat compared to the monster under which Adeline Yen Mah suffered. The author's memoir of life in mainland China and—after the 1949 revolution—Hong Kong is a gruesome chronicle of nonstop emotional abuse from her wealthy father and his beautiful, cruel second wife. Chinese proverbs scattered throughout the text pithily covey the traditional world view that prompted Adeline's subservience. Had she not escaped to America, where she experienced a fulfilling medical career and a happy marriage, her story would be unbearable; instead, it's grimly fascinating: Falling Leaves is an Asian Mommie Dearest.
Mirrors
Naguib Mahfouz Mirrors is one of Nobel laureate Naguib Mahfouz's more unusual works. First published in serialized form in the Egyptian television magazine, it consists of a series of vignettes of characters from a writer's life — a writer very like Mahfouz himself. And accompanying each vignette is a portrait of the character by a friend of the author, the renowned Alexandrian artist Seif Wanli.

Through each vignette — whether of a lifelong friend, a sometime adversary, or a childhood sweetheart — not only is that one character described but much light is thrown on other characters already familiar or yet to be encountered, as well as on the narrator himself, who we come to know well through the mirrors of his world of acquaintances.

At the same time, Mirrors also reflects the recent history of Egypt, its political movements, its leaders, its wars, and its peace, all of which affect the lives of friends and enemies and of the narrator himself. As the translator writes in his introduction, "the narrator's acquaintances from childhood, schooldays, and civil service career take him from the lofty heights of intellectual salons to the seamy squalor of brothels and drug dens; from the dreams of youth and nationalistic ideals to the sobering realities of post-revolutionary society and clashing economic and political values."

The apparently simple but penetrating portraits by Seif Wanli add an extra, distinctive dimension to this already intriguing book. They originally appeared with the serialized texts in the television magazine, but were omitted when the book was first published in 1972, and were also omitted when the English translation first appeared in 1977. Now, in this special edition, the pictures and the complete text appear together for the first time.
The Trouble with Islam Today: A Muslim's Call for Reform in Her Faith
Irshad Manji "I have to be honest with you. Islam is on very thin ice with me.... Through our screaming self-pity and our conspicuous silences, we Muslims are conspiring against ourselves. We're in crisis and we're dragging the rest of the world with us. If ever there was a moment for an Islamic reformation, it's now. For the love of God, what are we doing about it?"

In this open letter, Irshad Manji unearths the troubling cornerstones of mainstream Islam today: tribal insularity, deep-seated anti-Semitism, and an uncritical acceptance of the Koran as the final, and therefore superior, manifesto of God's will. But her message is ultimately positive. She offers a practical vision of how Islam can undergo a reformation that empowers women, promotes respect for religious minorities, and fosters a competition of ideas. Her vision revives "ijtihad," Islam's lost tradition of independent thinking. In that spirit, Irshad has a refreshing challenge for both Muslims and non-Muslims: Don't silence yourselves. Ask questions—-out loud. The Trouble with Islam Today is a clarion call for a fatwa-free future.
Self
Yann Martel A fictional autobiography of a young writer which takes the reader to Canada, Portugal, Greece, Turkey and elsewhere. This story of love, sex and ambiguity is the first novel by the Canadian author of the award-winning short-story collection, "The Facts Behind the Helsinki Roccamatios".
LIFE OF PI
Yann Martel Some books defy categorisation: Life of Pi, the second novel from Canadian writer Yann Martel, is a case in point: just about the only thing you can say for certain about it is that it is fiercely and admirably unique. The plot, if that’s the right word, concerns the oceanic wanderings of a lost boy, the young and eager Piscine Patel of the title (Pi). After a colourful and loving upbringing in gorgeously-hued India, the Muslim-Christian-animistic Pi sets off for a fresh start in Canada. His blissful voyage is rudely interrupted when his boat is scuppered halfway across the Pacific, and he is forced to rough it in a lifeboat with a hyena, a monkey, a whingeing zebra and a tiger called Richard. That would be bad enough, but from here on things get weirder: the animals start slaughtering each other in a veritable frenzy of allegorical bloodlust, until Richard the tiger and Pi are left alone to wander the wastes of ocean, with plenty of time to ponder their fate, the cruelty of the gods, the best way to handle storms and the various different recipes for oothappam, scrapple and coconut yam kootu. The denouement is pleasantly neat. According to the blurb, thirtysomething Yann Martel spent long years in Alaska, India, Mexico, France, Costa Rica, Turkey and Iran, before settling in Canada. All those cultures and more have been poured into this spicy, vivacious, kinetic and very entertaining fiction. —Sean Thomas
Beatrice and Virgil
Yann Martel
A Game of Thrones
George R.R. Martin Readers of epic fantasy series are: (1) patient—they are left in suspense between each volume, (2) persistent—they reread or at least review the previous book(s) when a new installment comes out, (3) strong—these 700-page doorstoppers are heavy, and (4) mentally agile—they follow a host of characters through a myriad of subplots. In A Game of Thrones, the first book of a projected six, George R.R. Martin rewards readers with a vividly real world, well-drawn characters, complex but coherent plotting, and beautifully constructed prose, which Locus called "well above the norms of the genre."

Martin's Seven Kingdoms resemble England during the Wars of the Roses, with the Stark and Lannister families standing in for the Yorks and Lancasters. The story of these two families and their struggle to control the Iron Throne dominates the foreground; in the background is a huge, ancient wall marking the northern border, beyond which barbarians, ice vampires, and direwolves menace the south as years-long winter advances. Abroad, a dragon princess lives among horse nomads and dreams of fiery reconquest.

There is much bloodshed, cruelty, and death, but A Game of Thrones is nevertheless compelling; it garnered a Nebula nomination and won the 1996 Locus Award for Best Fantasy Novel. So, on to A Clash of Kings! —Nona Vero
AVA
Carole Maso In a celebration of life and joy, a professor recalls the thirty-nine years of her life as she lies dying, revealing emotional and intellectual richness and variety, including the horrors of her family's experiences during World War II. Reprint. IP.
In the Country of Men
Hisham Matar Libya, 1979. Nine-year-old Suleiman’s days are circumscribed by the narrow rituals of childhood: outings to the ruins surrounding Tripoli, games with friends played under the burning sun, exotic gifts from his father’s constant business trips abroad. But his nights have come to revolve around his mother’s increasingly disturbing bedside stories full of old family bitterness. And then one day Suleiman sees his father across the square of a busy marketplace, his face wrapped in a pair of dark sunglasses. Wasn’t he supposed to be away on business yet again? Why is he going into that strange building with the green shutters? Why did he lie?

Suleiman is soon caught up in a world he cannot hope to understand—where the sound of the telephone ringing becomes a portent of grave danger; where his mother frantically burns his father’s cherished books; where a stranger full of sinister questions sits outside in a parked car all day; where his best friend’s father can disappear overnight, next to be seen publicly interrogated on state television.

In the Country of Men is a stunning depiction of a child confronted with the private fallout of a public nightmare. But above all, it is a debut of rare insight and literary grace.

From the Hardcover edition.
Angela's Ashes: A Memoir
Frank McCourt "Worse than the ordinary miserable childhood is the miserable Irish childhood," writes Frank McCourt in Angela's Ashes. "Worse yet is the miserable Irish Catholic childhood." Welcome, then, to the pinnacle of the miserable Irish Catholic childhood. Born in Brooklyn in 1930 to recent Irish immigrants Malachy and Angela McCourt, Frank grew up in Limerick after his parents returned to Ireland because of poor prospects in America. It turns out that prospects weren't so great back in the old country either—not with Malachy for a father. A chronically unemployed and nearly unemployable alcoholic, he appears to be the model on which many of our more insulting cliches about drunken Irish manhood are based. Mix in abject poverty and frequent death and illness and you have all the makings of a truly difficult early life. Fortunately, in McCourt's able hands it also has all the makings for a compelling memoir.
The Book of Scenes for Acting Practice
McGraw-Hill The Book of Scenes for Acting Practice provides a variety of styles, characters, and types of drama to sharpen students' acting skills. The scenes range from Sophocles and Shakespeare to O'Neill and Ionesco, and were selected for variety and ease of presentation.
Ultimate Spy:
H Keith Melton Historian H. Keith Melton is a specialist in 20th-century espionage; he's also quite a fan of espionage gadgetry. Both interests make strong showings in this heavily illustrated glimpse into the shadowy world of modern spying. Melton examines the role of clandestine intelligence in revolutionary Russia and Nazi Germany, analyses modern spy rings, and profiles a number of important figures in the demimonde of spooks, among them British code breaker Alan Turing and Yugoslav double agent Dusan Popov. He also showcases some astonishing hardware, ranging from suitcase radios to shirt button microphones and mechanical pencil pistols. Former CIA director William Colby and former KGB general Oleg Kalugin, who recruited the American traitor John Walker, contribute forewords.
The Compact Bedford Introduction to Literature: Reading, Thinking, Writing
Michael Meyer This new compact edition of The Bedford Introduction to Literature offers all the distinctive features of Michael Meyer's best-selling introduction to literature in a shorter, less expensive paperback format. A generous and vibrant selection of stories, poems, and plays are supported by editorial features proven to help students read, think, and write effectively about literature. Now featuring unique visual portfolios and a CD-ROM packed with activities and contextual material, the new edition brings literature to life for students like never before.
Twilight
Stephanie Meyer
Eclipse
Stephenie Meyer Readers captivated by Twilight and New Moon will eagerly devour Eclipse, the much anticipated third book in Stephenie Meyer's riveting vampire love saga. As Seattle is ravaged by a string of mysterious killings and a malicious vampire continues her quest for revenge, Bella once again finds herself surrounded by danger. In the midst of it all, she is forced to choose between her love for Edward and her friendship with Jacob —- knowing that her decision has the potential to ignite the ageless struggle between vampire and werewolf. With her graduation quickly approaching, Bella has one more decision to make: life or death. But which is which?
New Moon
Stephenie Meyer Legions of readers entranced by Twilight are hungry for more and they won't be disappointed. In New Moon, Stephenie Meyer delivers another irresistible combination of romance and suspense with a supernatural twist. The "star-crossed" lovers theme continues as Bella and Edward find themselves facing new obstacles, including a devastating separation, the mysterious appearance of dangerous wolves roaming the forest in Forks, a terrifying threat of revenge from a female vampire and a deliciously sinister encounter with Italy's reigning royal family of vampires, the Volturi. Passionate, riveting, and full of surprising twists and turns, this vampire love saga is well on its way to literary immortality.
Marielitos, Balseros and Other Exiles
Cecilia Rodriguez Milanes "Complex and woeful, Milanés's rich ensemble act may remind readers of Junot Diaz's Drown and Denis Johnson's Jesus' Son."—Publishers Weekly

“In Marielitos, Balseros, and Other Exiles, Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés presents an amazing diversity of characters. Here are voices I have never heard before in American Literature. With clarity, tenderness, but unflinching courage, she fills in some of the blank faces that have been left out of our minority mosaic. Here are the lowest of the low, marginalized even by their own, but springing to full, complex, rich, engaging reality. Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés creates a big enough imaginative space for their lives and their stories. We are all the richer for having this new storyteller with this first, promising collection join our Latino and American literature circles.”—Julia Alvarez, author of How the García Girls Lost Their Accents, In the Time of the Butterflies, Saving the World and Return to Sender.

A panoramic portrait of the Cuban American community, Marielitos, Balseros and Other Exiles shares the joys, tragedies, and amazing resiliency of the Cuban immigrants who arrived in this country via the Mariel boat lift of 1980 (marielitos) and the “rafters” (balseros) who came in the years afterward. The stories in this debut collection reveal the full social, economic and emotional scope of the immigrant experience, from the repression that many of the “boat people” experienced in Castro’s Cuba, the discrimination they encounter upon their arrival in America, and their struggles to build a new life in the United States. Written in an arresting style that marries English with the native Spanish of the characters, Marielitos, Balseros and Other Exiles is an important achievement by a new voice in Latino Literature.
Essential ActionScript 3.0
Colin Moock ActionScript 3.0 is a huge upgrade to Flash's programming language. The enhancements to ActionScript's performance, feature set, ease of use, cleanliness, and sophistication are considerable. Essential ActionScript 3.0 focuses on the core language and object-oriented programming, along with the Flash Player API. Essential ActionScript has become the #1 resource for the Flash and ActionScript development community, and the reason is the author, Colin Moock. Many people even refer to it simply as "The Colin Moock book." And for good reason: No one is better at turning ActionScript inside out, learning its nuances and capabilities, and then explaining everything in such an accessible way. Colin Moock is not just a talented programmer and technologist; he's also a gifted teacher. Essential ActionScript 3.0 is a radically overhauled update to Essential ActionScript 2.0. True to its roots, the book once again focuses on the core language and object-oriented programming, but also adds a deep look at the centerpiece of Flash Player's new API: display programming. Enjoy hundreds of brand new pages covering exciting new language features, such as the DOM-based event architecture, E4X, and namespaces—all brimming with real-world sample code. The ActionScript 3.0 revolution is here, and Essential ActionScript 3.0's steady hand is waiting to guide you through it.
Court of Shadows
Cynthia Morgan She didn't intend to defy the conventions of Elizabethan England... But willfull, impulsive, and strikingly beautiful gentlewoman Kat Langdon disguises herself as a boy, masters the sword and entangles herself in a treacherous web of intrigue with Queen Elizabeth's spies.
If Aristotle Ran General Motors
Tom Morris Philosophy purists take note: yes, this is a business self-help book. But Tom Morris has plenty of philosophical street credibility: after getting his Ph.D. from Yale, he taught for 15 years at the University of Notre Dame (where stunts like bringing the ND marching band to class for an impromptu "pep rally" before a big test made him one of the most popular professors on campus). And Morris isn't dumbing down his message for the corporate culture. Rather, he's genuinely interested in fostering a workplace environment where one can seriously think about truth, beauty, goodness, and unity. "If we let the great philosophers guide our thinking," he says, "and if we then begin to become philosophers ourselves, we put ourselves in the very best position to move towards genuine excellence, true prosperity, and deeply satisfying success in our businesses, our families, and our lives. Why should we settle for anything less?" Why indeed?
Beloved
Toni Morrison In the troubled years following the Civil War, the spirit of a murdered child haunts the Ohio home of a former slave. This angry, destructive ghost breaks mirrors, leaves its fingerprints in cake icing, and generally makes life difficult for Sethe and her family; nevertheless, the woman finds the haunting oddly comforting for the spirit is that of her own dead baby, never named, thought of only as Beloved.

A dead child, a runaway slave, a terrible secret—these are the central concerns of Toni Morrison's Pulitzer Prize-winning Beloved. Morrison, a Nobel laureate, has written many fine novels, including Song of Solomon, The Bluest Eye, and Paradise—but Beloved is arguably her best. To modern readers, antebellum slavery is a subject so familiar that it is almost impossible to render its horrors in a way that seems neither clichéd nor melodramatic. Rapes, beatings, murders, and mutilations are recounted here, but they belong to characters so precisely drawn that the tragedy remains individual, terrifying to us because it is terrifying to the sufferer. And Morrison is master of the telling detail: in the bit, for example, a punishing piece of headgear used to discipline recalcitrant slaves, she manages to encapsulate all of slavery's many cruelties into one apt symbol—a device that deprives its wearer of speech. "Days after it was taken out, goose fat was rubbed on the corners of the mouth but nothing to soothe the tongue or take the wildness out of the eye." Most importantly, the language here, while often lyrical, is never overheated. Even as she recalls the cruelties visited upon her while a slave, Sethe is evocative without being overemotional: "Add my husband to it, watching, above me in the loft—hiding close by—the one place he thought no one would look for him, looking down on what I couldn't look at at all. And not stopping them—looking and letting it happen.... And if he was that broken then, then he is also and certainly dead now." Even the supernatural is treated as an ordinary fact of life: "Not a house in the country ain't packed to its rafters with some dead Negro's grief. We lucky this ghost is a baby," comments Sethe's mother-in-law.

Beloved is a dense, complex novel that yields up its secrets one by one. As Morrison takes us deeper into Sethe's history and her memories, the horrifying circumstances of her baby's death start to make terrible sense. And as past meets present in the shape of a mysterious young woman about the same age as Sethe's daughter would have been, the narrative builds inexorably to its powerful, painful conclusion. Beloved may well be the defining novel of slavery in America, the one that all others will be measured by. —Alix Wilber
A Mercy
Toni Morrison A powerful tragedy distilled into a jewel of a masterpiece by the Nobel Prize–winning author of Beloved and, almost like a prelude to that story, set two centuries earlier.

In the 1680s the slave trade was still in its infancy. In the Americas, virulent religious and class divisions, prejudice and oppression were rife, providing the fertile soil in which slavery and race hatred were planted and took root.

Jacob is an Anglo-Dutch trader and adventurer, with a small holding in the harsh north. Despite his distaste for dealing in “flesh,” he takes a small slave girl in part payment for a bad debt from a plantation owner in Catholic Maryland. This is Florens, “with the hands of a slave and the feet of a Portuguese lady.” Florens looks for love, first from Lina, an older servant woman at her new master’s house, but later from a handsome blacksmith, an African, never enslaved.

There are other voices: Lina, whose tribe was decimated by smallpox; their mistress, Rebekka, herself a victim of religious intolerance back in England; Sorrow, a strange girl who’s spent her early years at sea; and finally the devastating voice of Florens’ mother. These are all men and women inventing themselves in the wilderness.

A Mercy reveals what lies beneath the surface of slavery. But at its heart it is the ambivalent, disturbing story of a mother who casts off her daughter in order to save her, and of a daughter who may never exorcise that abandonment.

Acts of mercy may have unforeseen consequences.
Three Cups of Tea
Greg Mortenson
Creating America: Reading and Writing Arguments
Joyce Moser, Ann Watters Designed for Writing/Composition courses-especially those with a focus on argument and/or research-this reader/rhetoric emphasizes the argumentative strategies students need to analyze and write arguments. At the same time, it helps students see that Americans have always defined themselves and maintained a sense of unity-despite great diversity-through ongoing public debate about what America means. Selections reflect colonial times to the present, and include posters, photographs, advertisements, and court cases in addition to essays, poems, and stories.
Kafka on the Shore
Haruki Murakami
Lolita
Vladimir Nabokov Despite its lascivious reputation, the pleasures of Lolita are as much intellectual as erogenous. It is a love story with the power to raise both chuckles and eyebrows. Humbert Humbert is a European intellectual adrift in America, haunted by memories of a lost adolescent love. When he meets his ideal nymphet in the shape of 12-year-old Dolores Haze, he constructs an elaborate plot to seduce her, but first he must get rid of her mother. In spite of his diabolical wit, reality proves to be more slippery than Humbert's feverish fantasies, and Lolita refuses to conform to his image of the perfect lover.

Playfully perverse in form as well as content, riddled with puns and literary allusions, Nabokov's 1955 novel is a hymn to the Russian-born author's delight in his adopted language. Indeed, readers who want to probe all of its allusive nooks and crannies will need to consult the annotated edition. Lolita is undoubtedly, brazenly erotic, but the eroticism springs less from the "frail honey-hued shoulders ... the silky supple bare back" of little Lo than it does from the wantonly gorgeous prose that Humbert uses to recount his forbidden passion: She was musical and apple-sweet ... Lola the bobby-soxer, devouring her immemorial fruit, singing through its juice ... and every movement she made, every shuffle and ripple, helped me to conceal and to improve the secret system of tactile correspondence between beast and beauty—between my gagged, bursting beast and the beauty of her dimpled body in its innocent cotton frock. Much has been made of Lolita as metaphor, perhaps because the love affair at its heart is so troubling. Humbert represents the formal, educated Old World of Europe, while Lolita is America: ripening, beautiful, but not too bright and a little vulgar. Nabokov delights in exploring the intercourse between these cultures, and the passages where Humbert describes the suburbs and strip malls and motels of postwar America are filled with both attraction and repulsion, "those restaurants where the holy spirit of Huncan Dines had descended upon the cute paper napkins and cottage-cheese-crested salads." Yet however tempting the novel's symbolism may be, its chief delight—and power—lies in the character of Humbert Humbert. He, at least as he tells it, is no seedy skulker, no twisted destroyer of innocence. Instead, Nabokov's celebrated mouthpiece is erudite and witty, even at his most depraved. Humbert can't help it—linguistic jouissance is as important to him as the satisfaction of his arrested libido. —Simon Leake
Invitation to a Beheading
Vladimir Nabokov Like Kafka's The Castle, Invitation to a Beheading embodies a vision of a bizarre and irrational world. In an unnamed dream country, the young man Cincinnatus C. is condemned to death by beheading for "gnostical turpitude." an imaginary crime that defies definition. Cincinnatus spends his last days in an absurd jail, where he is visited by chimerical jailers. an executioner who masquerades as a fellow prisoner, and by his in-laws. who lug their furniture with them into his cell. When Cincinnatus is led out to be executed. he simply wills his executioners out of existence: they disappear, along with the whole world they inhabit.
Pnin
Vladimir Nabokov (Book Jacket Status: Jacketed)

One of the best-loved of Nabokov’s novels, Pnin features his funniest and most heart-rending character. Professor Timofey Pnin is a haplessly disoriented Russian émigré precariously employed on an American college campus in the 1950s. Pnin struggles to maintain his dignity through a series of comic and sad misunder-standings, all the while falling victim both to subtle academic conspiracies and to the manipulations of a deliberately unreliable narrator.

Initially an almost grotesquely comic figure, Pnin gradually grows in stature by contrast with those who laugh at him. Whether taking the wrong train to deliver a lecture in a language he has not mastered or throwing a faculty party during which he learns he is losing his job, the gently preposterous hero of this enchanting novel evokes the reader’s deepest protective instinct.

Serialized in The New Yorker and published in book form in 1957, Pnin brought Nabokov both his first National Book Award nomination and hitherto unprecedented popularity.
Reading Lolita in Tehran: A Memoir in Books
Azar Nafisi Every Thursday morning for two years in the Islamic Republic of Iran, Azar Nafisi, a bold and inspired teacher, secretly gathered seven of her most committed female students to read forbidden Western classics. Some came from conservative and religious families, others were progressive and secular; some had spent time in jail. They were shy and uncomfortable at first, unaccustomed to being asked to speak their minds, but soon they removed their veils and began to speak more freely–their stories intertwining with the novels they were reading by Jane Austen, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Henry James, and Vladimir Nabokov. As Islamic morality squads staged arbitrary raids in Tehran, as fundamentalists seized hold of the universities and a blind censor stifled artistic expression, the women in Nafisi’s living room spoke not only of the books they were reading but also about themselves, their dreams and disappointments.

Azar Nafisi’s luminous masterwork gives us a rare glimpse, from the inside, of women’s lives in revolutionary Iran. Reading Lolita in Tehran is a work of great passion and poetic beauty, a remarkable exploration of resilience in the face of tyranny, and a celebration of the liberating power of literature.
Things I've Been Silent About: Memories
Azar Nafisi I started making a list in my diary entitled “Things I Have Been Silent About.” Under it I wrote: “Falling in Love in Tehran. Going to Parties in Tehran. Watching the Marx Brothers in Tehran. Reading Lolita in Tehran.” I wrote about repressive laws and executions, about public and political abominations. Eventually I drifted into writing about private betrayals, implicating myself and those close to me in ways I had never imagined.
—From Things I Have Been Silent About

Azar Nafisi, author of the beloved international bestseller Reading Lolita in Tehran, now gives us a stunning personal story of growing up in Iran, memories of her life lived in thrall to a powerful and complex mother, against the background of a country’s political revolution. A girl’s pain over family secrets; a young woman’s discovery of the power of sensuality in literature; the price a family pays for freedom in a country beset by political upheaval–these and other threads are woven together in this beautiful memoir, as a gifted storyteller once again transforms the way we see the world and “reminds us of why we read in the first place” (Newsday).

Nafisi’s intelligent and complicated mother, disappointed in her dreams of leading an important and romantic life, created mesmerizing fictions about herself, her family, and her past. But her daughter soon learned that these narratives of triumph hid as much as they revealed. Nafisi’s father escaped into narratives of another kind, enchanting his children with the classic tales like the Shahnamah, the Persian Book of Kings. When her father started seeing other women, young Azar began to keep his secrets from her mother. Nafisi’s complicity in these childhood dramas ultimately led her to resist remaining silent about other personal, as well as political, cultural, and social, injustices.

Reaching back in time to reflect on other generations in the Nafisi family, Things I’ve Been Silent About is also a powerful historical portrait of a family that spans many periods of change leading up to the Islamic Revolution of 1978-79, which turned Azar Nafisi’s beloved Iran into a religious dictatorship. Writing of her mother’s historic term in Parliament, even while her father, once mayor of Tehran, was in jail, Nafisi explores the remarkable “coffee hours” her mother presided over, where at first women came together to gossip, to tell fortunes, and to give silent acknowledgment of things never spoken about, and which then evolved into gatherings where men and women would meet to openly discuss the unfolding revolution.

Things I’ve Been Silent About is, finally, a deeply personal reflection on women’s choices, and on how Azar Nafisi found the inspiration for a different kind of life. This unforgettable portrait of a woman, a family, and a troubled homeland is a stunning book that readers will embrace, a new triumph from an author who is a modern master of the memoir.
Magic Seeds
V.S. Naipaul
Ladies Coupe
Anita Nair Meet Akhila: forty-five and single, an income-tax clerk, and a woman who has never been allowed to live her own life - always the daughter, the sister, the aunt, the provider - until the day she gets herself a one-way ticket to the seaside town of Kanyakumari. In the intimate atmosphere of the all-women sleeping car - the 'Ladies Coupe' - Akhila asks the five women the question that has been haunting her all her adult life: can a woman stay single and be happy, or does she need a man to feel complete?

This wonderfully atmospheric, deliciously warm novel takes the reader into the heart of women's lives in contemporary India, revealing how the dilemmas that women face in their relationships with hunsbands, mothers, friends, employers and children are the same world over.
Mistress: A Novel
Anita Nair When travel writer Christopher Stewart arrives at a riverside resort in Kerala, India to meet Koman, Radha’s uncle and a famous dancer, he enters a world of masks and repressed emotions. From their first meeting, both Radha and her uncle are drawn to the enigmatic young man with his cello and his incessant questions about the past. The triangle quickly excludes Shyam, Radha’s husband, who can only watch helplessly as she embraces Chris with a passion that he has never been able to draw from her. Also playing the role of observer-participant is Koman; his life story, as it unfolds, captures all the nuances and contradictions of the relationships being made—and unmade—in front of his eyes.
Prisoner of Tehran: One Woman's Story of Survival Inside an Iranian Prison
Marina Nemat What would you give up to protect your loved ones? Your life?

In her heartbreaking, triumphant, and elegantly written memoir, Prisoner of Tehran, Marina Nemat tells the heart-pounding story of her life as a young girl in Iran during the early days of Ayatollah Khomeini's brutal Islamic Revolution.

In January 1982, Marina Nemat, then just sixteen years old, was arrested, tortured, and sentenced to death for political crimes. Until then, her life in Tehran had centered around school, summer parties at the lake, and her crush on Andre, the young man she had met at church. But when math and history were subordinated to the study of the Koran and political propaganda, Marina protested. Her teacher replied, "If you don't like it, leave." She did, and, to her surprise, other students followed.

Soon she was arrested with hundreds of other youths who had dared to speak out, and they were taken to the notorious Evin prison in Tehran. Two guards interrogated her. One beat her into unconsciousness; the other, Ali, fell in love with her.

Sentenced to death for refusing to give up the names of her friends, she was minutes from being executed when Ali, using his family connections to Ayatollah Khomeini, plucked her from the firing squad and had her sentence reduced to life in prison. But he exacted a shocking price for saving her life — with a dizzying combination of terror and tenderness, he asked her to marry him and abandon her Christian faith for Islam. If she didn't, he would see to it that her family was harmed. She spent the next two years as a prisoner of the state, and of the man who held her life, and her family's lives, in his hands.

Lyrical, passionate, and suffused throughout with grace and sensitivity, Marina Nemat's memoir is like no other. Her search for emotional redemption envelops her jailers, her husband and his family, and the country of her birth — each of whom she grants the greatest gift of all: forgiveness.
The Time Traveler's Wife
Audrey Niffenegger A dazzling novel in the most untraditional fashion, this is the remarkable story of Henry DeTamble, a dashing, adventuresome librarian who travels involuntarily through time, and Clare Abshire, an artist whose life takes a natural sequential course. Henry and Clare's passionate love affair endures across a sea of time and captures the two lovers in an impossibly romantic trap, and it is Audrey Niffenegger's cinematic storytelling that makes the novel's unconventional chronology so vibrantly triumphant.

An enchanting debut and a spellbinding tale of fate and belief in the bonds of love, The Time Traveler's Wife is destined to captivate readers for years to come.
Introducing NLP: Psychological Skills for Understanding and Influencing People
Joseph O'Connor, John Seymour NLP skills are proving invaluable for personal development and professional excellence in counselling, education, and business.
Contemporary Linguistics
William O'Grady, Michael Dobrovolsky, Francis Katamba Contemporary Linguistics can be used from first year through to final year as a main text for students taking degree courses in linguistics, English language and cognitive science and by MA students on TEFL courses. It is also highly suitable for students taking language options in media and cultural studies, modern language, psychology and philosophy, as well as for speech therapy courses. Contemporary Linguistics : An introduction is a comprehensive, fully up-to-date introduction to linguistics. The book covers not only how language is structured, but also how it functions both socially and culturally, and how it is acquired and processed by speakers. It will prepare students to go on to more advanced work and, at the same time, will serve as a basic reference that students can continue to consult throughout their studies. The text explores all the core areas of linguistics as well as numerous interdisciplinary and related areas. *Core topics covered include phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, the genetic and typological classification of the languages of the world, and historical linguistics. *Interdisciplinary areas discussed include language and the brain, psycholinguistics - the study of language processing, first and second language acquisition, language in social contexts and the fast-growing area of computational linguistics. *Related areas explored include writing systems and animal communication.
The Successful Investor: What 80 Million People Need to Know to Invest Profitably and Avoid Big Losses
William J. O'Neil FROM THE AUTHOR OF THE BUSINESSWEEK, USA TODAY, AND WALL STREET JOURNAL BUSINESS BESTSELLER HOW TO MAKE MONEY IN STOCKS!

Simple-to-follow strategies for making—and keeping—profits in today's perilous stock market

More than 80 million investors lost 50 to 80 percent of their savings in the recent stock market crash. Investor's Business Daily publisher William J. O'Neil, however, was one of the first to see—and warn investors about—the dangers inherent in what had been, up to that point, a historic bull market run. Those who followed his counsel were able to sidestep devastating losses and emerge with their sizable bull market profits largely intact.

In The Successful Investor, O'Neil steps up to tell all investors how they can make money and, more important, avoid losses in up markets, down markets, and everything in between. Showing how mistakes made in the recent market collapse were amazingly similar to those made in previous down cycles, O'Neil reveals simple steps investors can follow to avoid costly mistakes and: Buy only the best stocks at only the best timesFollow a market-tested 3-to-1 Profit-and-Loss Percentage PlanKnow when to sell for the biggest possible profitRecognize chart patterns that presage enormous market movesManage a portfolio over time to maximize its returns

William O'Neil has succeeded in virtually every market environment by following a stable, nonemotional investment plan. In his latest book, O'Neil explains how anyone can follow that plan to become a profitable long-term investor, regardless of market tides or turns.

The Successful Investor will bring reason and welcome relief to all investors buffeted and bewildered by the perils and uncertainty of today's stock market.
Words You Should Know
David Olsen
1984
George Orwell George Orwell's prophetic, nightmarish vision of "Negative Utopia" is timelier than ever-and its warnings more powerful.
1984
George Orwell George Orwell's prophetic, nightmarish vision of "Negative Utopia" is timelier than ever-and its warnings more powerful.
Management Information Systems, Second Edition
Effy Oz This title provides current real business examples, expanded coverage of the Internet and business data communications, and a wider range of end-of-chapter activities that encourage users to use the tools they will encounter and the skills they will need in business every day.
The Black Book
Orhan Pamuk
Macroeconomics with Electronic Study Guide CD-ROM
Michael Parkin For six editions, Michael Parkin has written and rewritten with the unwavering goal of opening students' eyes to the economic way of thinking. Using a straight forward, precise, and clear writing style, Parkin puts the student at center stage. Parkin offers a thorough and detailed presentation of modern economics, including dynamic comparative advantage, game theory, rational expectations, new growth theory, and real business cycle theory. To promote a rich, active learning experience, Parkin offers a comprehensive online learning environment featuring a dynamic e-book, interactive tutorials and quizzes, daily news updates, and more. Changes to the Sixth Edition include a new introductory chapter that emphasizes the central role of tradeoffs in economics, a new chapter on Global Stock Markets, all-new Reading Between the Lines, and a full-color Electronic Study Guide CD-ROM packaged with every new textbook for free.
Fish: A Memoir of a Boy in a Man's Prison
T. J. Parsell When seventeen-year-old T. J. Parsell held up the local Photo Mat with a toy gun, he was sentenced to four and a half to fifteen years in prison. The first night of his term, four older inmates drugged Parsell and took turns raping him. When they were through, they flipped a coin to decide who would "own" him. Forced to remain silent about his rape by a convict code among inmates (one in which informers are murdered), Parsell's experience that first night haunted him throughout the rest of his sentence. In an effort to silence the guilt and pain of its victims, the issue of prisoner rape is a story that has not been told. For the first time Parsell, one of America's leading spokespeople for prison reform, shares the story of his coming of age behind bars. He gives voice to countless others who have been exposed to an incarceration system that turns a blind eye to the abuse of the prisoners in its charge. Since life behind bars is so often exploited by television and movie re-enactments, the real story has yet to be told. Fish is the first breakout story to do that.
Man and Boy: A Novel
Tony Parsons HE HAD TO FACE THE TOUGHEST JOB OF HIS LIFE. AND HE NEVER ONCE THOUGHT HE'D BE ON HIS OWN.

Harry had it all: a beautiful wife, an adorable four-year-old son, and a high-paying media job. But on the eve of his thirtieth birthday, with one irresponsible act, he threw it all away. Suddenly he finds himself an unemployed single father trying to figure out how to wash his son's hair the way Mommy did and whether green spaghetti is proper breakfast food. This brilliantly engaging novel will tug at your heart as Harry learns to become a father to his son and a son to his aging father, takes stabs at finding new love, and makes the hardest decision of his life.
One for My Baby: A Novel
Tony Parsons From the bestselling author of Man and Boy and Man and Wife comes the charming story of a widower who doesn't believe you get a second chance at love. Full of biting social commentary and overwhelming emotion, One for My Baby is a warm and witty novel of love, family, sex, and Tai Chi.

Returning to London from Hong Kong after a brief, idyllic marriage ends in tragedy, Alfie Budd finds his world collapsing. Believing his chance for love has passed, he takes comfort in fleeting affairs with his students at Churchill's Language School while watching his parents' marriage, his grandmother's health, and his career ambitions rapidly deteriorate. But then Alfie meets two people who help him to start healing: the old Chinese man he sees practicing Tai Chi in the park every morning and a single mother who needs Alfie's help in completing her education. Soon, our bereft widower is learning much more than Tai Chi and falling for one student above all others. But can Alfie give up meaningless sex for a meaningful relationship? And how much room in our hearts do we really have for love?
Your Official America Online < Internet Guide, 4th Edition
Peal
Formulation, Implementation, and Control of Competitive Strategy
John A. Pearce, Richard B. Robinson Contemporary research in strategic management, with an emphasis on conceptual tools and skills created by scholars and practitioners in the field are evident throughout this 11-chapter book. Pearce and Robinson's "Formulation, Implementation and Control, 9e", retains its high level of academic credibility and its market-leading emphasis on Strategic Practice. The material presented here is the text material that can be found in "Strategic Management, 9e". It continues to have strong support from longtime adopters and growing support in schools with a desire to provide straightforward treatment of strategic management with a practical, systematic approach. Pearce and Robinson will continue to use a unique pedagogical model created by the authors to provide logic and structure to its treatment of strategic management, which in turn makes the material more easily organized by the instructor and learned by the student.
At Home in the World
Daniel Pearl, Mariane Pearl Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl became the focus of international concern when he was kidnapped by Islamic extremists in Pakistan while investigating a story. News of his brutal murder in February 2002 was universally denounced, a tragic loss of a good man and a compassionate journalist who was at home anywhere in the world.

At Home in the World celebrates Pearl's life through 50 of his best stories. Edited by his longtime friend and colleague, Helene Cooper, At Home in the World gives testimony to Mr. Pearl's extraordinary skill as a writer and to his talent for friendship and collaboration. With datelines from the United States and abroad, the articles showcase a dogged reporter who never lost sight of the humanity behind the news. A foreword by his widow, Mariane Pearl, and a contribution by his father, Judea Pearl, celebrate his desire to change the world, his basic decency and fair-mindedness and his sense of fun and love of family.

Mr. Pearl's eye for quirky stories — many of which appeared in the Journal's iconic "middle column" — and his skill in tracking leads, uncovering wrongdoing and making friends of strangers of all backgrounds and cultures are apparent throughout this carefully assembled collection. The selections range from child beauty pageants in the South to the making of the world's largest Persian rug to the Taliban's exploitation of a gemstone market in order to fund terrorism. Anecdotes from friends and colleagues in the introduction to each section provide background, context and a glimpse of his life at the Journal.

At Home in the World keeps alive Daniel Pearl's spirit through his words and the work that was so important to him.
Microsoft® Visual C#® 2008 Express Edition: Build a Program Now! (PRO-Developer)
Patrice Pelland
My Uncle Napoleon: A Novel
Iraj Pezeshkzad The most beloved Iranian novel of the twentieth century

“God forbid, I’ve fallen in love with Layli!” So begins the farce of our narrator’s life, one spent in a large extended Iranian family lorded over by the blustering, paranoid patriarch, Dear Uncle Napoleon. When Uncle Napoleon’s least-favorite nephew falls for his daughter, Layli, family fortunes are reversed, feuds fired up and resolved, and assignations attempted and thwarted.

First published in Iran in the 1970s and adapted into a hugely successful television series, this beloved novel is now “Suggested Reading” in Azar Nafisi’s Reading Lolita in Tehran. My Uncle Napoleon is a timeless and universal satire of first love and family intrigue.
Crossing the River
Caryl Phillips
50 Key Concepts in Gender Studies
Dr Jane Pilcher, Dr Imelda Whelehan `Lively and impressive. I can easily imagine this text being used by both gender and women's studies undergraduates and postgraduates. In particular it will enable students to get a sense of how older and more contemporary theoretical movements and debates relate to one another' - Lisa Adkins, Department of Sociology, University of Manchester

Part of a new `Key Concepts' series published by SAGE, Key Concepts in Gender Studies offers 1,500 word expositions of 50 topics central to the field.

Jane Pilcher and Imelda Whelehan's introduction gives an account of gender studies - what it is and how it originated. Their selection of topics is authoritative and the 50 entries reflect the complex, multi-faceted nature of the field in an accessible dictionary format.

Each of the 50 key concepts:

· begins with a concise definition

· includes illustrations of how the concept has been applied within the field

· offers examples which allow a critical re-evaluation of the concept

· is cross-referenced with the other key concepts

· makes further reading suggestions.

The level of detail offered encourages understanding of gender studies without sacrificing depth detail and critical evaluation essential to convey the complexity of the issues dealt with. As such, the book appeals both to undergraduate and postgraduate students across a range of social science disciplines.

50 Key Concepts in Gender Studies gives testimony to the health of gender studies and related disciplines and looks forward to an ever-shifting dynamic of debates and ideas.
The Trial and Death of Socrates
Plato The third edition of The Trial and Death of Socrates presents G. M. A. Grube's distinguished translations, as revised by John Cooper for Plato, Complete Works. A number of new or expanded footnotes are also included along with a Select Bibliography.
Tales of Mystery and Imagination (Wordsworth Classics)
Edgar Allan Poe
A Guide to SQL, Sixth Edition
Philip J. Pratt Illustrates the basics of SQL programming using straightforward instruction, numerous examples, and a running case. Based on Oracle9i, this text can be used for instruction in any version of SQL.
Kiss of the Spider Woman
Manuel Puig Sometimes they talk all night long. In the still darkness of their cell, Molina re-weaves the glittering and fragile stories of the film he loves, and the cynical Valentin listens. Valentin believes in the just cause which makes all suffering bearable; Molina believes in the magic of love which makes all else endurable. Each has always been alone, and always - especially now - in danger of betrayal. But in cell, each surrenders to the other something of himself that he has never surrendered before.
Omerta
Mario Puzo Omerta, the third novel in Mario Puzo's Mafia trilogy, is infinitely better than the third Godfather film, and most movies in fact. Besides colorful characters and snappy dialogue, it's got a knotty, gratifying, just-complex-enough plot and plenty of movie-like scenes. The newly retired Mafioso Don Raymonde Aprile attends his grandson's confirmation at St. Patrick's in New York, handing each kid a gold coin. Long shot: "Brilliant sunshine etched the image of that great cathedral into the streets around it." Medium shot: "The girls in frail cobwebby white lace dresses, the boys [with] traditional red neckties knitted at their throats to ward off the Devil." Close-up: "The first bullet hit the Don square in the forehead. The second bullet tore out his throat."

More crucial than the tersely described violence is the emotional setting: a traditional, loving clan menaced by traditional vendettas. With Don Aprile hit, the family's fate lies in the strong hands of his adopted nephew from Sicily, Astorre. The Don kept his own kids sheltered from the Mafia: one son is an army officer; another is a TV exec; his daughter Nicole (the most developed character of the three) is an ace lawyer who liked to debate the Don on the death penalty. "Mercy is a vice, a pretension to powers we do not have ... an unpardonable offense to the victim," the Don maintained. Astorre, a macaroni importer and affable amateur singer, was secretly trained to carry on the Don's work. Now his job is to show no mercy.

But who did the hit? Was it Kurt Cilke, the morally tormented FBI man who recently jailed most of the Mafia bosses? Or Timmona Portella, the Mob boss Cilke still wants to collar? How about Marriano Rubio, the womanizing, epicurean Peruvian diplomat who wants Nicole in bed—did he also want her papa's head?

If you didn't know Puzo wrote Omerta, it would be no mystery. His marks are all over it: lean prose, a romance with the Old Country, a taste for olives in barrels, a jaunty cynicism ("You cannot send six billionaires to prison," says Cilke's boss. "Not in a democracy"), an affection for characters with flawed hearts, like Rudolfo the $1,500-an-hour sexual massage therapist, or his short-tempered client Aspinella, the one-eyed NYPD detective. The simultaneous courtship of cheery Mafia tramp Rosie by identical hit-man twins Frankie and Stace Sturzo makes you fall in love with them all—and feel a genuine pang when blood proves thicker than eros.

This fitting capstone to Puzo's career is optioned for a film, and Michael Imperioli of TV's The Sopranos narrates the audiocassette version of the novel. But why wait for the movie? Omerta is a big, old-fashioned movie in its own right. —Tim Appelo
One True Thing: A Novel
Anna Quindlen One True Thing is a film starring Meryl Streep as the cancer-stricken homemaker mother, Renee Zellweger as the daughter who quits her top-dog job to care for her, and William Hurt as the chilly professor who lets the women in the family do the heavy emotional lifting dying requires. But the real star of the project remains former New York Times everyday-life columnist Anna Quindlen, who quit her top-dog job to write novels (and who took time off from college to nurse her own dying mother).

Quindlen hit a nerve with One True Thing, which captures an experience seldom dealt with in popular culture. (One exception: the sensitive 1996 film with Streep and Leonardo DiCaprio of the play Marvin's Room.) Though the heroine of One True Thing, Ellen Gulden, is a golden girl with two brothers who'll lose her career the instant she steps off the fast track, society concurs with her dad, who says, "It seems to me another woman is what's wanted here."

The book is a mother-daughter tale that should please fans of, say, The Joy Luck Club. It's not flashy, but it has a deep feel for the way children often discover, just before it's too late, who their parents really are. "Our parents are never people to us," Ellen writes, "they're always character traits.... There is only room in the lifeboat of your life for one, and you always choose yourself, and turn your parents into whatever it takes to keep you afloat." The mercy-killing subplot isn't gripping, but the palpable sense of deepening family intimacy certainly is. —Tim Appelo
The Language Police: How Pressure Groups Restrict What Students Learn
Diane Ravitch The impulse in the 1960s and ‘70s to achieve fairness and a balanced perspective in our nation’s textbooks and standardized exams was undeniably necessary and commendable. Then how could it have gone so terribly wrong? Acclaimed education historian Diane Ravitch answers this question in her informative and alarming book, The Language Police: How Pressure Groups Restrict What Students Learn. Author of 7 books, Ravitch served as the U.S. Assistant Secretary of Education from 1991 to 1993. Her expertise and her 30-year commitment to education lend authority and urgency to this important book, which describes in copious detail how pressure groups from the political right and left have wrested control of the language and content of textbooks and standardized exams, often at the expense of the truth (in the case of history), of literary quality (in the case of literature), and of education in general. Like most people involved in education, Ravitch did not realize "that educational materials are now governed by an intricate set of rules to screen out language and topics that might be considered controversial or offensive." In this clear-eyed critique, she is an unapologetic challenger of the ridiculous and damaging extremes to which bias guidelines and sensitivity training have been taken by the federal government, the states, and textbook publishers.

In a multi-page sampling of rejected test passages, we discover that "in the new meaning of bias, it its considered biased to acknowledge that lack of sight is a disability," that children who live in urban areas cannot understand passages about the country, that the Aesop fable about a vain (female) fox and a flattering (male) crow promotes gender bias. As outrageous as many of the examples are, they do not appear particularly dangerous. However, as the illustrations of abridgment, expurgation, and bowdlerization mount, the reader begins to understand that our educational system is indeed facing a monumental crisis of distortion and censorship. Ravitich ends her book with three suggestions of how to counter this disturbing tendency. Sadly, however, in the face of the overwhelming tide of misinformation that has already been entrenched in the system, her suggestions provide cold comfort. —Silvana Tropea
Introduction to e-Commerce, 2/e, with e-Commerce PowerWeb
Jeffrey Rayport, Bernard Jaworski, Breakaway Solutions Inc. Introduction to E-Commerce, 2/e, by Rayport and Jaworksi, can be used as the principles book for e-commerce. Much like there is a Principles of Marketing that is intended to be the first course in marketing, The text covers the entire landscape of e-commerce. The key message is that faculty who want to teach an introductory class on e-commerce and focus on the strategy parts of e-commerce first and technology second, should adopt this book. Faculty who teach marketing, management, strategy and entrepreneurship as the core discipline prefer this book over technology-oriented e-commerce books. Introduction to e-Commerce gives present and future practitioners of e-Commerce a solid foundation in all aspects of conducting business in the networked economy. The text focus is on what a manager needs to know about Internet infrastructure, strategy formulation and implementation, technology concepts, public policy issues, and capital infrastructure in order to make effective business decisions. This is presented in a framework for the study and practice of e-Commerce with business strategy at the core surrounded by four infrastructures; the technology infrastructure that underlies the Internet, the media infrastructure that provides the content for businesses, public policy regulations that provide both opportunities and constraints, and the capital infrastructure that provides the money and capital to run the businesses. Within this framework, the authors provide a deep exploration of core concepts of online strategy and associated enablers enriched by a wide variety of examples, case studies, and explanations culled directly from practice.
Monday Mourning
Kathy Reichs
OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT: Seventh Edition
Heizer / Render
Cracking the GMAT with DVD, 2009 Edition
Princeton Review Cracking the GMAT offers major features on DVD, including engaging video tutorials from The Princeton Review’s top instructors. We also bring you over 200 practice questions in the book and exclusive free access to 4 practice exams and expert advice online.

Of course, you’ll also get all the test-prep techniques you expect from The Princeton Review. In Cracking the GMAT, we’ll teach you how to think like the test writers and

·Solve complex sentence correction problems by recognizing key errors
·Crack tough data sufficiency questions using simple techniques
·Practice online with full-length tests, lessons, and drills
·Get the most out of your prep time with the study plan that’s right for you

We give you plenty of practice problems to help you master our proven techniques. Our practice questions are just like those you’ll see on the real GMAT–but with detailed answers and explanations for every question.
The McDonaldization of Society
George Ritzer `Most undergraduate students today have never lived in an un-McDonaldized world, and because this book speaks to them, it sparks lively class discussions. This new edition is finely updated, and even more interesting, as it demonstrates the globalization of McDonaldization and the various ways different cultures individually adapt to it' - Nathan W Pino, Georgia Southern University

` The McDonaldization of Society is one of the most influential works of the last half of this century… Ritzer was both an analyst and prophet in this classic work, which is as relevant today as it was a decade ago' - Jonathan H Turner, University of California

One of the most noteworthy and popular sociology books of all time, The McDonaldization of Society demonstrates the power of the sociological imagination to today's readers in a way that few books have been able to do. It is ideal for use in a wide range of undergraduate courses and will be of equal interest to anyone interested in social criticism. This book links a large number of social phenomena to McDonaldization, some which are directly affected by the principles of the fast-food restaurant and others where the effect is more indirect. The new edition has been revised and updated and includes:

·An expanded chapter on The Practical Guide to Dealing with McDonaldization, covering the many other ways of coping with the process. There is a larger treatment of collective organizational efforts to deal with, as well as individual ways of escaping, McDonaldization.

·An addition to the Frontiers of McDonaldization chapter to deal not only with birth and death but also with death defying acts - like efforts to climb Mt. Everest.

·A new discussion of globalization

·A discussion on disenchantment.
Management: 2003 Update, Seventh Edition
Stephen P. Robbins, Mary Coulter, Stephen P Robbins For undergraduate courses in Principles of Management. The #1 book in the principles market. A 16-page bound insert dealing with issues in the news: corporate corruption, trust, ethics, leadership, etc... ROLLS website with Self-Assessment Library, management scenarios, quizzing and FAQs.
The Princessa : Machiavelli for Women
Harriet Rubin A legacy of leadership for women only.

For centuries men have used the lessons of Machiavelli's The Prince to gain and hold power. Today's women, struggling to succeed in a man's world, must learn a crucial lesson of their own: men and women are not equal—and that is a woman's greatest strength. From the wars of intimacy to battles of public life, whether confronting bosses, competitors, or lovers, the greatest power belongs to the woman who dares to use the subtle weapons that are hers alone.

This provocative work urges women to claim what they want and deserve, offering a bold new battle plan that celebrates a woman's unique gifts: passion and intuition, sensitivity and cunning. It draws from history's legendary female divas and poets, saints and sinners, artists and activists—who, armed with a desire for justice and a spirit of outrageousness, achieved their impossible dreams. Their lasting legacy is codified in The Princessa: act like a woman, fight like a woman, and life will be yours to command.
The Satanic Verses: A Novel
Salman Rushdie No book in modern times has matched the uproar sparked by Salman Rushdie's The Satanic Verses, which earned its author a death sentence. Furor aside, it is a marvelously erudite study of good and evil, a feast of language served up by a writer at the height of his powers, and a rollicking comic fable. The book begins with two Indians, Gibreel Farishta ("for fifteen years the biggest star in the history of the Indian movies") and Saladin Chamcha, a Bombay expatriate returning from his first visit to his homeland in 15 years, plummeting from the sky after the explosion of their jetliner, and proceeds through a series of metamorphoses, dreams and revelations. Rushdie's powers of invention are astonishing in this Whitbread Prize winner.
Culture and Imperialism
Edward W. Said Edward Said makes one of the strongest cases ever for the aphorism, "the pen is mightier than the sword." This is a brilliant work of literary criticism that essentially becomes political science. Culture and Imperialism demonstrates that Western imperialism's most effective tools for dominating other cultures have been literary in nature as much as political and economic. He traces the themes of 19th- and 20th-century Western fiction and contemporary mass media as weapons of conquest and also brilliantly analyzes the rise of oppositional indigenous voices in the literatures of the "colonies." Said would argue that it's no mere coincidence that it was a Victorian Englishman, Edward G. Bulwer-Lytton, who coined the phrase "the pen is mightier . . ." Very highly recommended for anyone who wants to understand how cultures are dominated by words, as well as how cultures can be liberated by resuscitating old voices or creating new voices for new times.
Culture and Imperialism
Edward W. Said Edward Said makes one of the strongest cases ever for the aphorism, "the pen is mightier than the sword." This is a brilliant work of literary criticism that essentially becomes political science. Culture and Imperialism demonstrates that Western imperialism's most effective tools for dominating other cultures have been literary in nature as much as political and economic. He traces the themes of 19th- and 20th-century Western fiction and contemporary mass media as weapons of conquest and also brilliantly analyzes the rise of oppositional indigenous voices in the literatures of the "colonies." Said would argue that it's no mere coincidence that it was a Victorian Englishman, Edward G. Bulwer-Lytton, who coined the phrase "the pen is mightier . . ." Very highly recommended for anyone who wants to understand how cultures are dominated by words, as well as how cultures can be liberated by resuscitating old voices or creating new voices for new times.
Season of Migration to the North: A Novel
Al-Tayyib Salih; Tayeb Salih Salih's shocking and beautiful novel reveals much about the people on each side of a cultural divide. A brilliant Sudanese student takes his mix of anger and obsession with the West to London, where he has affairs with women who are similarly obsessed with the mysterious East. Life, ecstasy, and death share the same moment in time. First published in Arabic in 1969.

Tayeb Salih was born in 1929 in the Northern Province of Sudan. He studied at the University of Khartoum and London University and has served as head of drama in the BBC s Arabic Service and director-general of information for the state of Qatar.
Denys Johnson-Davies has published more than twenty-five volumes of stories, novels, plays, and poetry translated from modern Arabic literature. He lives in Cairo.
Game Design: Secret of the Sages
Marc Saltzman BradyGames-Game Design: Secrets of the Sages-2nd Edition Features. More information about the console gaming market. How multiplayer gameplay is affecting the industry. More game and design theory, with inspirations and insights from the experts. Updated content on the newest, hottest games.
Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood
Marjane Satrapi A New York Times Notable Book
A Time Magazine “Best Comix of the Year”
A San Francisco Chronicle and Los Angeles Times Best-seller

Wise, funny, and heartbreaking, Persepolis is Marjane Satrapi’s memoir of growing up in Iran during the Islamic Revolution. In powerful black-and-white comic strip images, Satrapi tells the story of her life in Tehran from ages six to fourteen, years that saw the overthrow of the Shah’s regime, the triumph of the Islamic Revolution, and the devastating effects of war with Iraq. The intelligent and outspoken only child of committed Marxists and the great-granddaughter of one of Iran’s last emperors, Marjane bears witness to a childhood uniquely entwined with the history of her country.

Persepolis paints an unforgettable portrait of daily life in Iran and of the bewildering contradictions between home life and public life. Marjane’s child’s-eye view of dethroned emperors, state-sanctioned whippings, and heroes of the revolution allows us to learn as she does the history of this fascinating country and of her own extraordinary family. Intensely personal, profoundly political, and wholly original, Persepolis is at once a story of growing up and a reminder of the human cost of war and political repression. It shows how we carry on, with laughter and tears, in the face of absurdity. And, finally, it introduces us to an irresistible little girl with whom we cannot help but fall in love.
Embroideries
Marjane Satrapi From the best-selling author of Persepolis comes this gloriously entertaining and enlightening look into the sex lives of Iranian women. Embroideries gathers together Marjane’s tough-talking grandmother, stoic mother, glamorous and eccentric aunt and their friends and neighbors for an afternoon of tea drinking and talking. Naturally, the subject turns to love, sex and the vagaries of men.

As the afternoon progresses, these vibrant women share their secrets, their regrets and their often outrageous stories about, among other things, how to fake one’s virginity, how to escape an arranged marriage, how to enjoy the miracles of plastic surgery and how to delight in being a mistress. By turns revealing and hilarious, these are stories about the lengths to which some women will go to find a man, keep a man or, most importantly, keep up appearances.

Full of surprises, this introduction to the private lives of some fascinating women, whose life stories and lovers and will strike us as at once deeply familiar and profoundly different from our own, is sure to bring smiles of recognition to the faces of women everywhere–and to teach us all a thing or two.
Persepolis 2: The Story of a Return
Marjane Satrapi Picking up the thread where her debut memoir-in-comics concluded, Persepolis 2: The Story of a Return details Marjane Satrapi's experiences as a young Iranian woman cast abroad by political turmoil in her native country. Older, if not exactly wiser, Marjane reconciles her upbringing in war-shattered Tehran with new surroundings and friends in Austria. Whether living in the company of nuns or as the sole female in a house of eight gay men, she creates a niche for herself with friends and acquaintances who feel equally uneasy with their place in the world.

After a series of unfortunate choices and events leave her literally living in the street for three months, Marjane decides to return to her native Iran. Here, she is reunited with her family, whose liberalism and emphasis on Marjane's personal worth exert as strong an influence as the eye-popping wonders of Europe. Having grown accustomed to recreational drugs, partying, and dating, Marjane now dons a veil and adjusts to a society officially divided by gender and guided by fundamentalism. Emboldened by the example of her feisty grandmother, she tests the bounds of the morality enforced on the streets and in the classrooms. With a new appreciation for the political and spiritual struggles of her fellow Iranians, she comes to understand that "one person leaving her house while asking herself, 'is my veil in place?' no longer asks herself 'where is my freedom of speech?'"

Satrapi's starkly monochromatic drawing style and the keenly observed facial expressions of her characters provide the ideal graphic environment from which to appeal to our sympathies. Bereft of fine detail, this graphic novel guides the reader's attention instead toward a narrative rich with empathy. Don't be fooled by the glowering self-portrait of the author on the back flap; it’s nearly impossible to read Persepolis 2 without feeling warmth toward Marjane Satrapi. —Ryan Boudinot
Embroideries
Marjane Satrapi From the best–selling author of Persepolis comes this gloriously entertaining and enlightening look into the sex lives of Iranian women. Embroideries gathers together Marjane’s tough–talking grandmother, stoic mother, glamorous and eccentric aunt and their friends and neighbors for an afternoon of tea drinking and talking. Naturally, the subject turns to love, sex and the vagaries of men.

As the afternoon progresses, these vibrant women share their secrets, their regrets and their often outrageous stories about, among other things, how to fake one’s virginity, how to escape an arranged marriage, how to enjoy the miracles of plastic surgery and how to delight in being a mistress. By turns revealing and hilarious, these are stories about the lengths to which some women will go to find a man, keep a man or, most important, keep up appearances.

Full of surprises, this introduction to the private lives of some fascinating women, whose life stories and lovers will strike us as at once deeply familiar and profoundly different from our own, is sure to bring smiles of recognition to the faces of women everywhere—and to teach us all a thing or two.
Chicken with Plums
Marjane Satrapi In her acclaimed Persepolis books and in Embroideries, Marjane Satrapi rendered the events of her life and times in a uniquely captivating and powerful voice and vision. Now she turns that same keen eye and ear to the heartrending story of her great-uncle, a celebrated Iranian musician who gave up his life for music and love.

We are in Tehran in 1958, and Nasser Ali Khan, one of Iran’s most revered tar players, discovers that his beloved instrument is irreparably damaged. Though he tries, he cannot find one to replace it, one whose sound speaks to him with the same power and passion with which his music speaks to others. In despair, he takes to his bed, renouncing the world and all its pleasures, closing the door on the demands and love of his wife and his four children. Over the course of the week that follows, his family and close friends attempt to change his mind, but Nasser Ali slips further and further into his own reveries: flashbacks and flash-forwards (with unexpected appearances by the likes of the Angel of Death and Sophia Loren) from his own childhood through his children’s futures. And as the pieces of his story slowly fall into place, we begin to understand the profundity of his decision to give up life.

Marjane Satrapi brings what has become her signature humor, insight, and generosity to this emotional tale of life and death, and the courage and passion both require of us. The poignant story of one man, it is also a story of stunning universality–and an altogether luminous work.
The Lovely Bones
Alice Sebold Once in a generation a novel comes along that taps a vein of universal human experience, resonating with readers of all ages. THE LOVELY BONES is such a book — a #1 bestseller celebrated at once for its artistry, for its luminous clarity of emotion, and for its astonishing power to lay claim to the hearts of millions of readers around the world.
"My name was Salmon, like the fish; first name, Susie. I was fourteen when I was murdered on December 6, 1973."
So begins the story of Susie Salmon, who is adjusting to her new home in heaven, a place that is not at all what she expected, even as she is watching life on earth continue without her — her friends trading rumors about her disappearance, her killer trying to cover his tracks, her grief-stricken family unraveling. Out of unspeakable tragedy and loss, THE LOVELY BONES succeeds, miraculously, in building a tale filled with hope, humor, suspense, even joy.
The major motion picture version of THE LOVELY BONES, directed by Peter Jackson and starring Rachel Weisz, Susan Sarandon, Mark Wahlberg, Stanley Tucci, and Saoirse Ronan is scheduled for release on December 11, 2009.
The Bastard of Istanbul
Elif Shafak When The Bastard of Istanbul was published in Turkey, Elif Shafak was accused by nationalist lawyers of insulting Turkish identity. The charges were later dropped, and now readers in America can discover for themselves this bold and powerful tale. Populated with vibrant characters, The Bastard of Istanbul is the story of two families, one Turkish and one Armenian American, and their struggle to forge their unique identities against the backdrop of Turkey’s violent history. Filled with humor and understanding, this exuberant, dramatic novel is about memory and forgetting, about the tension between the need to examine the past and the desire to erase it.
Hamlet
William Shakespeare
The Tempest
William Shakespeare Each edition includes:

• Freshly edited text based on the best early printed version of the play

• Full explanatory notes conveniently placed on pages facing the text of the play

• Scene-by-scene plot summaries

• A key to famous lines and phrases

• An introduction to reading Shakespeare's language

• An essay by an outstanding scholar providing a modern perspective on the play

• Illustrations from the Folger Shakespeare Library's vast holdings of rare books

Essay by Barbara A. Mowat

The Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, D.C., is home to the world's largest collection of Shakespeare's printed works, and a magnet for Shakespeare scholars from around the globe. In addition to exhibitions open to the public throughout the year, the Folger offers a full calendar of performances and programs.
Pygmalion: A Romance in Five Acts (Penguin Classics)
George Bernard Shaw
Strangers in the House: Coming of Age in Occupied Palestine
Raja Shehadeh This revealing story of a father-son relationship, the first memoir of its kind by a Palestinian living in the Occupied Territories, is set against the backdrop of Middle East hostilities and more than thirty years under military occupation. Marked by a sense of loss and impermanence and embroiled in political conflict, it is the family drama of a difficult relationship between an idealistic son and his politically active father-Aziz Shehadeh, who, in 1967, was the first Palestinian to advocate a peaceful, two-state solution for the Israeli-Palestinian dispute-a situation further complicated by the arbitrary humiliations of living under the occupier's law. Above all, it is a moving description of the daily lives of those who have chosen to remain on their land.
Palestinian Walks: Notes on a Vanishing Landscape
Raja Shehadeh Over two decades of turmoil and change in the Middle East, steered via the history-soaked landscape of Palestine. This new edition includes a previously unpublished epigraph in the form of a walk. When Raja Shehadeh first started hill walking in Palestine, in the late 1970s, he was not aware that he was travelling through a vanishing landscape. These hills would have seemed familiar to Christ, until the day concrete was poured over the flora and irreversible changes were brought about by those who claim a superior love of the land. Six walks span a period of twenty-six years, in the hills around Ramallah, in the Jerusalem wilderness and through the ravines by the Dead Sea. Each walk takes place at a different stage of Palestinian history since 1982, the first in the empty pristine hills and the last amongst the settlements and the wall. The reader senses the changing political atmosphere as well as the physical transformation of the landscape. By recording how the land felt and looked before these calamities, Raja Shehadeh attempts to preserve, at least in words, the Palestinian natural treasures that many Palestinians will never know.
Frankenstein
Mary Shelley ENDURING LITERATURE ILLUMINATED BY PRACTICAL SCHOLARSHIP

A timeless, terrifying tale of one man's obsession to create life — and the monster that became his legacy.

EACH ENRICHED CLASSIC EDITION INCLUDES:

• A concise introduction that gives readers important background information

• A chronology of the author's life and work

• A timeline of significant events that provides the book's historical context

• An outline of key themes and plot points to help readers form their own interpretations

• Detailed explanatory notes

• Critical analysis, including contemporary and modern perspectives on the work

• Discussion questions to promote lively classroom and book group interaction

• A list of recommended related books and films to broaden the reader's experience

Enriched Classics offer readers affordable editions of great works of literature enhanced by helpful notes and insightful commentary. The scholarship provided in Enriched Classics enables readers to appreciate, understand, and enjoy the world's finest books to their full potential.

SERIES EDITED BY CYNTHIA BRANTLEY JOHNSON
The Stone Diaries:
Carol Shields This fictionalized autobiography of Daisy Goodwill Flett, captured in Daisy's vivacious yet reflective voice, has been winning over readers since its publication in 1995, when it won the Pulitzer Prize. After a youth marked by sudden death and loss, Daisy escapes into conventionality as a middle-class wife and mother. Years later she becomes a successful garden columnist and experiences the kind of awakening that thousands of her contemporaries in mid-century yearned for but missed in alcoholism, marital infidelity and bridge clubs. The events of Daisy's life, however, are less compelling than her rich, vividly described inner life—from her memories of her adoptive mother to her awareness of impending death. Shields' sensuous prose and her deft characterizations make this, her sixth novel, her most successful yet.
The Secret Supper: A Novel
Javier Sierra The Da Vinci juggernaut rolls on, this time in the capable hands of a bestselling author in the Spanish-speaking world. The Secret Supper has been ably translated by Alberto Manguel, author of A History of Reading, that delightful revelation that squiggles on a page are words, and words make stories. Set in 1497 Milan, at the time of the painting of the Cenacolo, or The Last Supper, in the refectory of Santa Maria delle Grazie, Sierra has created a tale of religious fanaticism, betrayal, murder, Church politics, artistic chicanery and mystery to confound the reader.

Fra Agostino Leyre, a Papal Inquisitor, is sent to Milan to confirm—or not—the messages of the "Soothsayer," who alleges that Leonardo Da Vinci is a heretic and has hidden heretical messages in his painting of The Last Supper. Leonardo is a figure larger than life, literally. A blue-eyed, tall, handsome man, always dressed in white, he is surrounded by faithful students and friends who are his acolytes. His brilliant mind, ranging over a multitude of ideas, has gained him a reputation for "hiding heterodox ideas in paintings apparently pious."

What Father Agostino follows is a labyrinthine path through alliances and rivalries, differences of opinion about Leonardo and a discussion of the heresy of the Cathars. They are a fascinating sect, more extra-Christianity than Christian heretics. Their practices are based on a belief that certain deprivations—primarily food and sex—will purify and make them worthy. Sierra is a very fine guide, taking the reader through palaces and monasteries rife with intrigue and typical of the flowering of intellect that came after the Dark Ages. It is a time when "Suddenly, from one day to the next, Plato's Greece, Cleopatra's Egypt and even the extravagant curiosities of the Chinese Empire that Marco Polo discovered seemed to deserve greater praise than our own Scriptural stories." Dangerous for the incumbency.

A compelling case is made that Leonardo's heretical beliefs are there for all to see in The Last Supper, if only we know how to find them. Sierra gives us the key—and keeps the suspense going right up to the end of the book. It isn't necessary to believe any of it, or even care if it's true, to enjoy this pilgrimage through another time and place. —Valerie Ryan
Animal Liberation
Peter Singer • The Book That Started A Revolution •

Since its original publication in 1975, this groundbreaking work has awakened millions of concerned men and women to the shocking abuse of animals everywhere—inspiring a worldwide movement to eliminate much of the cruel and unnecessary laboratory animal experimentation of years past. In this newly revised and expanded edition, author Peter Singer exposes the chilling realities of today's "factory forms" and product-testing procedures—offering sound, humane solutions to what has become a profound environmental and social as well as moral issue. An important and persuasive appeal to conscience, fairness, decency and justice, Animal Liberation is essential reading for the supporter and the skeptic alike.
Zoia's Gold
Philip Sington
The Tenth Planet
Dean Wesley Smith, Kristine Kathryn Rusch, Christopher Weaver, Rand Marlis 2017: NEAR THE PLANET URANUS

After a deep-space satellite mysteriously stops transmitting, the Hubble III telescope picks up a startling image. Astronomers don't know what the strange object is—only that it orbits past Earth every two millennia.

Meanwhile, archaeologist Leo Cross has discovered peculiar layers of black residue at dig sites around the globe. Stranger still, these thin bands occur like clockwork every 2,006 years, coinciding with some of the world's darkest moments in history.

We have six months to prepare for the next arrival. This time we know something is coming. This time we have weapons to defend us.

This time we'll be wrong . . . again.

A science fiction saga set on near-future Earth, THE TENTH PLANET challenges our basic beliefs about the solar system and ultimately our place in the universe. With cutting-edge astronomy, blockbuster action, and high drama, the mystery is revealed in a trilogy of adventures.
The Trouble Begins: A Box of Unfortunate Events, Books 1-3
Lemony Snicket, Brett Helquist The first Series of Unfortunate Events gift/box-set of this New York Times best-selling series.

The set includes The Bad Beginning, The Reptile Room, and The Wide Window.
Antigone
Sophocles Filled with passionate speeches and sensitive probing of moral and philosophical issues, this powerful drama reveals the grim fate that befalls the children of Oedipus. When Antigone, the daughter of Oedipus, chooses to obey the law of the gods rather than an unconscionable command from Creon, ruler of Thebes, she is condemned to death. How the gods take their revenge on Creon provides the gripping denouement to this compelling tragedy, still one of the most frequently performed of classical Greek dramas. Footnotes.
In the eye of the sun / Ahdaf Soueif
Ahdaf Soueif
Aisha
Ahdaf Soueif Written by the author of "In The Eye Of The Sun", this superb collection of stories is united by the central character, an Egyptian girl growing up in both Egypt and Britain. The stories are populated by the characters she meets, each moving in their own world as Aisha grows up and travels in Cairo and London.
The Map of Love: A Novel
Ahdaf Soueif Ahdaf Soueif's The Map of Love is a massive family saga, a story that draws its readers into two moments in the complex, troubled history of modern Egypt. The story begins in 1977 in New York. There Isabel Parkman discovers an old trunk full of documents—some in English, some in Arabic—in her dying mother's apartment. Incapable of deciphering this stash by herself, she turns to Omar al-Ghamrawi, a man with whom she is falling in love. And Omar directs her in turn to his sister Amal in Cairo.

Together the two women begin to uncover the stories embedded in the journal of Lady Anna Winterbourne, who traveled to Egypt in 1900 and fell in love with Sharif Pasha al-Barudi, an Egyptian nationalist. To their surprise, they stumble across some unsuspected connections between their own families. Less surprising, perhaps, is the persistence of the very same issues that dogged their ancestors: colonialism, Egyptian nationalism, and the clash of cultures throughout the Middle East. The past, however, does offer some semblance of omniscience: That is the beauty of the past; there it lies on the table: journals, pictures, a candle-glass, a few books of history. You leave it and come back to it and it waits for you—unchanged. You can turn back the pages, look again at the beginning. You can leaf forward and know the end. And you tell the story that they, the people who lived it, could only tell in part. With its multiple narratives and ever-shifting perspectives, The Map of Love would seem to cast some doubt on even the most confident historian's version of events. Yet this subtle and reflective tale of love does suggest that the relations between individuals can (sometimes) make a difference. "I am in an English autumn in 1897," Amal confesses at one point, "and Anna's troubled heart lies open before me." Here, perhaps, is a hint about how we should read Soueif's staggering novel, using words as a means to travel through time, space, and identity. —Vicky Lebeau
The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie: A Novel
Muriel Spark At the staid Marcia Blaine School for Girls, in Edinburgh, Scotland, teacher extraordinaire Miss Jean Brodie is unmistakably, and outspokenly, in her prime. She is passionate in the application of her unorthodox teaching methods, in her attraction to the married art master, Teddy Lloyd, in her affair with the bachelor music master, Gordon Lowther, and—most important—in her dedication to "her girls," the students she selects to be her crème de la crème. Fanatically devoted, each member of the Brodie set—Eunice, Jenny, Mary, Monica, Rose, and Sandy—is "famous for something," and Miss Brodie strives to bring out the best in each one. Determined to instill in them independence, passion, and ambition, Miss Brodie advises her girls, "Safety does not come first. Goodness, Truth, and Beauty come first. Follow me."

And they do. But one of them will betray her.
The Grapes of Wrath
John Steinbeck
The Confession
Olen Steinhauer
The Help
Kathryn Stockett
Baby's Room: Ideas and Projects for Nurseries
Jessica Strand Preparing a nursery may be a parent’s most joyful and meaningful decorating project ever. Filled with visions of the newborn swathed in soft blankets and tucked in a crib with a rocker at the ready, it’s easy to feel excited-and to be completely overwhelmed. Enter Baby’s Room. In the same winning format as Kids’ Rooms, this inspirational book shows that decorating and furnishing a room for a newborn need not be difficult or expensive. Author Jessica Strand offers practical counsel on all the elements of room layout-everything from furniture and fixtures to lighting and window treatments. Color choices, fabrics, and themes are also explored, along with baby-friendly storage systems.

To help parents visualize the possibilities, Baby’s Room showcases ten innovative nurseries that blend form and function with charm and creativity. With a comprehensive source list, easy make-it-yourself projects, and colorful photographs throughout, Baby’s Room delivers-everything but baby!
Mona Lisa Darkening
Sunny On the vernal equinox, Mona Lisa is taken against her will to NetherHell, the cursed realm of the damned. In this place, she will be torn from both within and without by desire, love, and ecstasy. And when her first love crosses the boundaries of the world to rescue her, she must choose her own destiny—before others choose it for her.
Six Suspects: A Novel
Vikas Swarup There’s a caste system—even in murder

 

From the author of the international bestseller Slumdog Millionaire comes a richly-textured tale of murder, corruption, and opportunity.

 

Seven years ago, Vivek “Vicky” Rai, the playboy son of the Home Minister of Uttar Pradesh, murdered bartender Ruby Gill at a trendy restaurant in New Delhi, simply because she refused to serve him a drink.

 

Now Vicky Rai has been killed at the party he was throwing to celebrate his acquittal. The police recover six guests with guns in their possession: a corrupt bureaucrat who claims to have become Mahatma Gandhi overnight; an American tourist infatuated with an Indian actress; a stone-age tribesman on a quest to recover a sacred stone; a Bollywood sex-symbol with a guilty secret; a mobile-phone thief who dreams big; and an ambitious politician prepared to stoop low.

 

Swarup unravels the lives and motives of the six suspects, offering both a riveting page-turner and an insightful peek into the heart of contemporary India. Audaciously and astutely plotted, with a panoramic imaginative sweep, Six Suspects is the work of a master storyteller. (20090601)
Sunset Oasis
Bahaa Taher
The Black Swan: The Impact of the Highly Improbable
Nassim Nicholas Taleb Bestselling author Nassim Nicholas Taleb continues his exploration of randomness in his fascinating new book, The Black Swan, in which he examines the influence of highly improbable and unpredictable events that have massive impact. Engaging and enlightening, The Black Swan is a book that may change the way you think about the world, a book that Chris Anderson calls, "a delightful romp through history, economics, and the frailties of human nature." See Anderson's entire guest review below.

Guest Reviewer: Chris Anderson

Chris Anderson is editor-in-chief of Wired magazine and the author of The Long Tail: Why the Future of Business Is Selling Less of More.

Four hundred years ago, Francis Bacon warned that our minds are wired to deceive us. "Beware the fallacies into which undisciplined thinkers most easily fall—they are the real distorting prisms of human nature." Chief among them: "Assuming more order than exists in chaotic nature." Now consider the typical stock market report: "Today investors bid shares down out of concern over Iranian oil production." Sigh. We're still doing it.

Our brains are wired for narrative, not statistical uncertainty. And so we tell ourselves simple stories to explain complex thing we don't—and, most importantly, can't—know. The truth is that we have no idea why stock markets go up or down on any given day, and whatever reason we give is sure to be grossly simplified, if not flat out wrong.

Nassim Nicholas Taleb first made this argument in Fooled by Randomness, an engaging look at the history and reasons for our predilection for self-deception when it comes to statistics. Now, in The Black Swan: the Impact of the Highly Improbable, he focuses on that most dismal of sciences, predicting the future. Forecasting is not just at the heart of Wall Street, but it’s something each of us does every time we make an insurance payment or strap on a seat belt.

The problem, Nassim explains, is that we place too much weight on the odds that past events will repeat (diligently trying to follow the path of the "millionaire next door," when unrepeatable chance is a better explanation). Instead, the really important events are rare and unpredictable. He calls them Black Swans, which is a reference to a 17th century philosophical thought experiment. In Europe all anyone had ever seen were white swans; indeed, "all swans are white" had long been used as the standard example of a scientific truth. So what was the chance of seeing a black one? Impossible to calculate, or at least they were until 1697, when explorers found Cygnus atratus in Australia.

Nassim argues that most of the really big events in our world are rare and unpredictable, and thus trying to extract generalizable stories to explain them may be emotionally satisfying, but it's practically useless. September 11th is one such example, and stock market crashes are another. Or, as he puts it, "History does not crawl, it jumps." Our assumptions grow out of the bell-curve predictability of what he calls "Mediocristan," while our world is really shaped by the wild powerlaw swings of "Extremistan."

In full disclosure, I'm a long admirer of Taleb's work and a few of my comments on drafts found their way into the book. I, too, look at the world through the powerlaw lens, and I too find that it reveals how many of our assumptions are wrong. But Taleb takes this to a new level with a delightful romp through history, economics, and the frailties of human nature. —Chris Anderson
Calculus for the Managerial, Life and Social Sciences
Soo Tang Tan, S. T. Tan In the Fifth Edition of CALCULUS FOR THE MANAGERIAL, LIFE, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES, author Soo Tan builds on the features that have made his texts market leaders - a real-life, problem-solving approach coupled with a concise writing style, a wealth of interesting and illustrative applications to help students understand the material, and technology coverage that is integrated, but optional, throughout the text. Tan is well known for his ability to present quantitative techniques in an intuitive and accessible yet accurate manner.
Civil Disobedience and Other Essays
Henry David Thoreau Philosopher, naturalist and rugged individualist, Thoreau has inspired generations of readers to think for themselves and to find meaning and beauty in nature. This representative sampling includes five of his most frequently read and cited essays: "On the Duty of Civil Disobedience" (1849), "Life without Principle" (1863), "Slavery in Massachusetts" (1854), "A Plea for Captain John Brown" (1869) and "Walking" (1862). Reprinted from standard editions.
Do What You Are: Discover the Perfect Career for You Through the Secrets of Personality Type
Paul D. Tieger, Barbara Barron For over 10 years Do What You Are has helped hundreds of thousands of people find the job that suits their personality type best. It lists the wide array of occupations that are popular with your personality type, including todays hottest career tracks in growth areas such as e-commerce, biotechnology, new media, and telecommunications. Throughout, the authors provide savvy career advice and highlight the strengths and pitfalls of each personality type with real-life examples.
The Art of Speed Reading People: How to Size People Up and Speak Their Language
Paul D. Tieger, Barbara Barron-Tieger Wouldn't it be great to have x-ray vision into other people's personalities - to know what they are thinking, what they care deeply about, their likes and dislikes? With x-ray vision you'd know how best to approach people, how to pique their interest in your ideas, how to strike a bargain, resolve a conflict, or simply help others feel more at ease relating to you.

A salesperson pitching a customer. A manager trying to motivate an employee. A teacher attempting to make a point with a student. In each of these situations, how do you determine what strategy is best? Should you joke around? Stick to the facts? Make small talk? Cut to the chase? The right approach can spell the difference between getting what you want from people and getting your signals crossed.

In THE ART OF SPEEDREADING PEOPLE, Paul D. Tieger and Barbara Barron-Tieger show how easy it is to identify key personality characteristics and how you can use this knowledge to communicate more effectively and achieve faster results. Filled with real-life examples and easy-to-follow directions, their book draws on the same scientifically validated Personality Type model that most Fortune 500 companies use. It will help you:
* Instantly identify the preferred communication styles of othesr
* Present ideas in ways more likely to lead to "Ye"
* Recognize the natural strengths and weaknesses of other people (and also understand your own)
* Identify the 4 different temperaments and 16 different personality types

Whether your goal is dealing more successfully with coworkers or employees, friends or family members, prospective customers or clients, THE ART OF SPEEDREADING PEOPLE offers you a powerful advantage in communicating with all types of people.
Just Your Type: Create the Relationship You've Always Wanted Using the Secrets of Personality Type
Paul D. Tieger, Barbara Barron-Tieger
Anna Karenina
Leo Tolstoy Some people say Anna Karenina is the single greatest novel ever written, which makes about as much sense to me as trying to determine the world's greatest color. But there is no doubt that Anna Karenina, generally considered Tolstoy's best book, is definitely one ripping great read. Anna, miserable in her loveless marriage, does the barely thinkable and succumbs to her desires for the dashing Vronsky. I don't want to give away the ending, but I will say that 19th-century Russia doesn't take well to that sort of thing.
Totally You!: Every Girl's Guide to Looking Good and Feeling Great!
Kate Tym
Because I'm a Girl
Various Eight authors, eight countries, eight unforgettable stories.

Authors Tim Butcher, Xiaolu Guo, Joanne Harris, Kathy Lette, Henning Mankell, Deborah Moggach, Marie Phillips and Irvine Welsh visited eight different countries and spoke to young women and girls about their lives, struggles and hopes. The result is an extraordinary collection of writings about prejudice, abuse and neglect, but also about courage, resilience and changing attitudes.
Journey to the Centre of the Earth (Puffin Classics)
Jules Verne
20,000 Leagues Under the Sea
Jules Verne Originally published in 1870, Verne’s amazing undersea adventure is one of the earliest science fiction novels ever written. Since that time, generations of readers have plunged below the ocean’s waves with Captain Nemo and his first-ever submarine, The Nautilus. It’s a voyage of exploration and the imagination.
No Angel
Penny Vincenzi This is the first volume of a trilogy about Lyttons, a great publishing house and the family that own it. The three books are set in the period before, during and after the Second World War and they cover the lives of three generations of this powerful and passionate family.

Book one will introduce Oliver Lytton, the head of the firm and indeed of the family and his beautiful wife, Lady Celia. They have three children: Giles, the ambitious heir to Lyttons who is engaged to the perfect woman for a man with an important future; Elspeth, who is spoilt, difficult and beautiful and already in a disastrous marriage to a rich philandering layabout; and Kit who, though an afterthought, is, at eleven years of age, the golden boy and the apple of his parents’ eye.

The story is about divided loyalties, both personal and professional, reaching crisis point when these two domains collide. It is about secrets, lies and the dangers of telling the truth. It is about ruthlessness, ambition and power. But above all, it is about a powerful family and the politics that are unavoidable.
Sheer Abandon
Penny Vincenzi
Air
Brenda Walpole An illustrated and detailed identification guide covering over 427 species, ranging from common residents to scarce passage migrants. Arranged by order and family, and colour coded tabs.
Feminism: A Very Short Introduction
Margaret Walters This is a historical account of feminism that looks at the roots of feminism, voting rights, and the liberation of the sixties, and analyzes the current situation of women across Europe, in the United States, and elsewhere in the world, particularly the Third World countries. Walters examines the difficulties and inequities that women still face, more than forty years after the "new wave" of 1960s feminism—difficulties, particularly, in combining domesticity, motherhood and work outside the home. How much have women's lives really changed? In the West, women still come up against the "glass ceiling" at work, with most earning considerably less than their male counterparts. What are we to make of the now commonplace insistence that feminism deprives men of their rights and dignities? And how does one tackle the issue of female emancipation in different cultural and economic environments—in, for example, Islam, Hinduism, the Middle East, Africa, and the Indian sub-continent?
50 Women Artists You Should Know
Christiane Weidemann, Petra Larass, Melanie Klier The latest volume in the successful series, this book offers more than five hundred years of achievements in art by women.

This beautifully produced, richly detailed and comprehensive survey of fifty influential women artists from the Renaissance to the Post-Modern era details their vast contributions to the art world. From the Early Baroque painter Artemisia Gentileschi and the seventeenth-century illustrator Maria Sibylla Merian to Impressionists Mary Cassatt and Berthe Morisot, and to modern icons such as Frida Kahlo, Georgia O Keefe and Louise Bourgeois, the most important female artists are profiled in this book in chronologically arranged double-page spreads. For each artist there is a timeline highlighting significant events in her life; a succinct biography and information outlining her accomplishments and influence; additional resources to further study of the artist and, best of all, brilliant full-color reproductions of the artist s works. Packed with information, here is a stunning and absorbing book that clearly illustrates the remarkable artistic contributions of women throughout history.
The Corporate Blogging Book
Debbie Weil
The Bridge of San Luis Rey: A Novel
Thornton Wilder "On Friday noon, July the twentieth, 1714, the finest bridge in all Peru broke and precipitated five travelers into the gulf below." With this celebrated sentence, Thornton Wilder begins The Bridge of San Luis Rey, one of the towering achievements in American fiction and a novel read throughout the world.

By chance, a monk witnesses the tragedy. Brother Juniper seeks to prove that it was divine intervention rather than chance that led to the deaths of those who perished in the tragedy. His study leads to his own death — and to the author's timeless investigation into the nature of love and the meaning of the human condition.

The Bridge of San Luis Rey is now reissued in this handsome hardcover edition featuring a new foreword by Russell Banks. Tappan Wilder has written an engaging and thought-provoking afterword, which includes unpublished notes for the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, illuminating photographs, and other remarkable documentary material. Granville Hicks's insightful comment about Wilder suggests an inveterate truth: "As a craftsman he is second to none, and there are few who have looked deeper into the human heart."
Double Act
Jacqueline Wilson Eve Karpf reads Jacqueline Wilson's Double Act in this unabridged three-cassette audio book. Identical twins Ruby and Garnet are inseparable. They do everything together and go everywhere together. They love being twins, and since the death of their mother they have been closer than ever, safe in their little world. But when Dad finds a new girlfriend everything in the twins' lives is turned upside down—new home, new school, new everything. And gradually, being twins isn't quite the same anymore.

In Double Act, Wilson brilliantly captures the pain and uncertainty that change can bring. This story of two little girls gradually realising that they have no control over what is happening is both funny and poignant. Wilson shines as the twins begin to accept that things will never be quite the same, allowing her characters to grow and develop as individuals without ever losing sight of the bond that holds them together. Running time is three hours and 40 minutes. —Susan Harrison
Bad Girls
Jacqueline Wilson Bad Girls, Jacqueline Wilson's eighth title, is read here in unabridged form by Josie Lawrence. It deals lightly but sensitively with the terrible pain suffered by a 10-year-old girl when she becomes the victim of vicious bullying at school. When the over-protected, intelligent Mandy is cast out by her so called girl "friends" at school she takes up with the trendy, cheerful 14-year-old Tanya. Because Mandy reminds Tanya of her much-loved kid sister in care, and because she too is lonely, the two quickly become best friends. But Tanya's unhappy life has made her turn to petty crime and before long Mandy finds herself in deep water. Bad Girls is a delightful and important book, dealing very well indeed with difficult emotional and social issues. The story is presented on three cassettes and runs for four hours and 20 minutes. —Tamsin Palmer
The Dare Game
Jacqueline Wilson Just when you think Jacqueline Wilson cannot possibly get any better, back she comes with another book to knock your socks off—in this instance, it is the return of one of Wilson's greatest heroines, Tracy Beaker.

The Story of Tracy Beaker introduced us to a mischievous 10-year-old girl coping with life in a children's home, lurching from one foster home to another and waiting for her ever-so-glamorous mum to come and take her away from it all.The Dare Game picks up where The Story of Tracy Beaker left off, with Tracy firmly ensconced in the home of foster mother Cam, a creative sort who was instantly drawn to the troubled child and who fought to win the right to take care of her.

The trouble is, Tracy thought things would be perfect with Cam but reality is tough. After all, it's hardly fair that Cam refuses to buy her foster daughter designer clothes and give her loads of money, now is it? So the petulant Tracy bunks off school and hides out in her secret place to avoid being teased by the other pupils and to stop herself from strangling Vomity Bagley, the English teacher. But one day her haven is disturbed by two very different boys, each dealing with their own problematic family lives, and the three form a friendship based on playing The Dare Game ... a game that gets more dangerous as Tracy's life becomes even more unsettled.

Trying to find new words to describe Wilson's writing is almost impossible—almost every review of any of her books is sure to feature "touching, funny and beautifully observed". The Dare Game is no exception. Tracy Beaker is a classic Wilson heroine—troubled, feisty and fired by humour, hope and true grit—and this superb novel is knock-em-dead proof that Jacqueline Wilson is simply the best. Age 8 and over —Susan Harrison
Vicky Angel
Jacqueline Wilson Every time a new Jacqueline Wilson book arrives, there is always a small part of every reviewer that dreads opening the book in case this time the author has missed the mark. But as yet, Wilson has never disappointed either the critics or her customers, and with Vicky Angel she once again pulls a little magic out of the hat and delivers another stunning novel with her trademark sensitivity and panache.

Jade and Vicky are best friends, but when Vicky is killed in an accident she doesn't let a little old thing like being dead interfere with her life. Instead, she continues as normal, following Jade around, telling her what to do, how to think, how to behave and ruining any chance Jade may have to make new friends. Eventually Jade tires of it all, and although she still loves Vicky deeply, she realises she has to get on with her own life.

Once again, Wilson digs deep and delves into tricky territory with a tenacity that at first shocks; but within a few minutes the shock subsides and the reader is drawn into Jade's world, willing her to come to terms with Vicky's death and praying that she will soon find her own way.

As ever, Wilson's characters are beautifully observed, and the story is filled to the brim with an emotional truth that is awe inspiring and captivating. Jade's response to Vicky's death, her realisation that the pedestal on which Vicky was placed during her short life was not as stable as she first believed and the ultimate release from the burden of guilt and love are dealt with with a sleight of hand that allows the reader to become completely involved with the story without a hint of darkness, captured instead by a lightness of touch that can only serve to make Wilson's peers green with envy.

The Illustrated Mum was the absolute best. Vicky Angel, a sort of Truly, Madly, Deeply for kids, runs an extraordinarily tight second. (Age 8 and over) —Susan Harrison
Vicky Angel
Jacqueline Wilson Jade is so used to being with and agreeing with Vicky, her larger-than-life best friend, that when a tragic accident occurs, she can hardly believe that Vicky’s gone. But Vicky is a spunky girl who’s not going to let a small thing like death stop her from living life to the fullest. Whether Jade is in school, running, or tentatively trying to make new friends, Vicky makes her presence felt, and it’s not always a good thing.

From the Hardcover edition.
The Art of Strategy: A New Translation of Sun Tzu's "The Art of War": A New Translation of Sun Tzu's "The Art of War"
Wing
The PowerBook
Jeanette Winterson While many other novels are still nursing hangovers from the 20th century, The PowerBook has risen early to greet the challenge of the new millennium. Set in cyberspace, Jeanette Winterson's seventh novel (or eighth, if you count her disowned Boating for Beginners) travels with ease, casting the net of its love story over Paris, Capri, and London. Its interactive narrator, Ali, is a "language costumier" who will swathe your imagination in the clothes of transformation: all you have to do is decide whom you want to be. Ali—known also as Alix—is a virtual narrator in a networked world of e-writing. You are the reader, invited to inhabit the story—any story—you wish to be told. As in all the best video games, you can choose your location, your character, even the clothes you want to wear. Beware: you can enter and play, but you cannot determine the outcome.

Ali/x is a digital Orlando for the modern age, moving across time and through transmutations of identity, weaving her stories with "long lines of laptop DNA" and shaping herself to the reader's desire. She wants to make love as simple as a song, but even in cyberspace there is no love without pain. Ali/x offers a stranger on the other side of the screen the opportunity of freedom for one night. She falls in love with her beautiful stranger, and finds herself reinvented by her own story.

The PowerBook is rich with historical allegory and literary allusion. Winterson's dialogue crackles with humor, snappy dialogue, and good jokes, several of which are at her own expense. This is a world of disguise, boundary crossing, and emotional diversions that change the navigation of the plot of life. Strangely sprouting tulips are erected in place of the phallus. Husbands and wives are uncoupled. Lovers disappear in the night to escape from themselves. On the hard drive of The PowerBook are stored a variety of stories that the reader can download and open at will, complete stories that loop through the central narrative. The tale of Mallory's third expedition, the disinterring of the Roman Governor of London in Spitalfields Church, or the contemplation of "great and ruinous lovers" are capsules of narrative compression. In Winterson's compacted meaning, language becomes a character in its own right—it is one of the heroes of the novel.

"What I am seeking to do in my work is to make a form that answers to 21st-century needs," Winterson has written. The PowerBook does just that. Her prose has found a metaphor for its linguistic forms of creation that feels almost invented for her, "a web of coordinates that will change the world." There will be a virtual rush of Internet-themed books in the networked naughties. With The PowerBook Winterson has triumphantly gotten there first. —Rachel Holmes
Simply Einstein: Relativity Demystified
Richard Wolfson With this reader-friendly book, it doesn't take an Einstein to understand the theory of relativity and its remarkable consequences.

In clear, understandable terms, physicist Richard Wolfson explores the ideas at the heart of relativity and shows how they lead to such seeming absurdities as time travel, curved space, black holes, and new meaning for the idea of past and future. Drawing from years of teaching modern physics to nonscientists, Wolfson explains in a lively, conversational style the simple principles underlying Einstein's theory.

Relativity, Wolfson shows, gave us a new view of space and time, opening the door to questions about their flexible nature: Is the universe finite or infinite? Will it expand forever or eventually collapse in a "big crunch"? Is time travel possible? What goes on inside a black hole? How does gravity really work? These questions at the forefront of twenty-first-century physics are all rooted in the profound and sweeping vision of Albert Einstein's early twentieth-century theory. Wolfson leads his readers on an intellectual journey that culminates in a universe made almost unimaginably rich by the principles that Einstein first discovered. 48 b/w illustrations.
Mrs Dalloway
Virginia Woolf, Stella McNichol, Elaine Showalter On a June morning in 1923, Clarissa Dalloway is preparing for a party and remembering her past. Elsewhere in London, Septimus Smith is suffering from shell-shock and on the brink of madness. Their days interweave and their lives converge as the party reaches its glittering climax. Here, Virginia Woolf perfected the interior monologue and the novel's lyricism and accessibility have made it one of her most popular works.
The Swiss Family Robinson (Puffin Classics)
Johann Wyss
The Good Women of China: Hidden Voices
Xinran When Deng Xiaoping’s efforts to “open up” China took root in the late 1980s, Xinran recognized an invaluable opportunity. As an employee for the state radio system, she had long wanted to help improve the lives of Chinese women. But when she was given clearance to host a radio call-in show, she barely anticipated the enthusiasm it would quickly generate. Operating within the constraints imposed by government censors, “Words on the Night Breeze” sparked a tremendous outpouring, and the hours of tape on her answering machines were soon filled every night. Whether angry or muted, posing questions or simply relating experiences, these anonymous women bore witness to decades of civil strife, and of halting attempts at self-understanding in a painfully restrictive society. In this collection, by turns heartrending and inspiring, Xinran brings us the stories that affected her most, and offers a graphically detailed, altogether unprecedented work of oral history.
Hagakure: The Book of the Samauri
Tsunetomo Yamamoto |Hagakure ("In the Shadow of Leaves"') is a manual for the samurai classes consisting of a series of short anecdotes and reflections that give both insight and instruction-in the philosophy and code of behavior that foster the true spirit of Bushido-the Way of the Warrior. It is not a book of

philosophy as most would understand the word: it is a collection of thoughts and sayings recorded over a period of seven years, and as such covers a wide variety of subjects, often in no particular sequence. 

The work represents an attitude far removed from our modern pragmatism and materialism, and posesses an intuitive rather than rational appeal in its assertion that Bushido is a Way of Dying, and that only a samurai retainer prepared and willing to die at any moment can be totally true to his lord.

While Hagakure was for many years a secret text known only to the warrior vassals of the Hizen fief to which the author belonged, it later came to be recognized as a classic exposition of samurai thought and came to influence many subsequent generations, including Yukio Mishima. 

This translation offers 300 selections that constitute the core texts of the 1,300 present in the original.
The Shadow of the Wind
Carlos Ruiz Zafón Barcelona, 1945—A great world city lies shrouded in secrets after the war, and a boy mourning the loss of his mother finds solace in his love for an extraordinary book called The Shadow of the Wind, by an author named Julian Carax. When the boy searches for Carax’s other books, it begins to dawn on him, to his horror, that someone has been systematically destroying every copy of every book the man has ever written. Soon the boy realizes that The Shadow of the Wind is as dangerous to own as it is impossible to forget, for the mystery of its author’s identity holds the key to an epic story of murder, madness, and doomed love that someone will go to any lengths to keep secret.
A Beggar at Damascus Gate
Yasmine Zahran Cold and alone in an ancient Palestinian village, a travelling archeologist finds the threads of a narrative that will direct his life for the coming decade. Its characters are a Palestinian woman, an English man, each deeply committed to the conflicting demands of love and national loyalties. As the narrator slowly pieces together the fate of the two unfortunate lovers, he also uncovers a tale of treachery, duplicity, and passion that highlights the contemporary plight of the enormous numbers of displaced Palestinians. Their final resolution surprises them both and reveals a depth to their commmitments that neither had previously realized.
Public Speaking: Strategies for Success
David Zarefsky Public Speaking: Strategies for Success proposes that at all stages of the public speaking process, students learn how to develop and apply strategies to speaking situations they encounter throughout their lives. Critical listening, audience analysis, choosing a speech topic, researching a speech topic, reasoning, arrangement and organization of a speech, style and delivery of a speech, informing, persuading, and special occasion speaking. Introductory public speaking.
¡Arriba! Comunicación y cultura with CD-ROM, Third Edition
Eduardo F. Zayas-Bazán, Susan M. Bacon This book exemplifies learning the Spanish language within its cultural context—an approach that incorporates the products, perspectives, and practices important to understanding the Hispanic culture, while including the vocabulary and structures that are required to communicate within it. It contains fifteen lecciones, topically organized and designed to encourage communication and offer insight into the language and culture of over 300 million people. Chapter topics include Spanish names and nicknames; universities in Spanish speaking countries; shopping; reading advertisements; making travel arrangements; expressing wishes and daily routines; persuading others; exchanging money at the bank; and the media. For individuals interested in learning the culture behind the vocabulary and grammar of the Spanish language.
The Book Thief
Markus Zusak It’s just a small story really, about among other things: a girl, some words, an accordionist, some fanatical Germans, a Jewish fist-fighter, and quite a lot of thievery. . . .

Set during World War II in Germany, Markus Zusak’s groundbreaking new novel is the story of Liesel Meminger, a foster girl living outside of Munich. Liesel scratches out a meager existence for herself by stealing when she encounters something she can’t resist–books. With the help of her accordion-playing foster father, she learns to read and shares her stolen books with her neighbors during bombing raids as well as with the Jewish man hidden in her basement before he is marched to Dachau.

This is an unforgettable story about the ability of books to feed the soul.

From the Hardcover edition.